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NAEYC Lesson Plans

  • 1.  NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 5 days ago
    Hi all,
    We came up with bi-weekly lesson plans for each classroom to meet some accreditation criteria and I'm wondering if the lesson plans are required to be weekly or could be a longer time-frame. For our infant classroom I don't actually want our teachers changing all the toys every week; it can be disruptive to the children's exploration of what's there and can be overstimulating. I looked through the NAEYC website and can't find a requirement about the amount of time a lesson plan has to cover and am hoping it is flexible! I'd also be interested in seeing some successful lesson plans that are developmentally appropriate for infants! Thanks in advance for any evidence, thoughts, or resources you have.

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    Christa Edwards
    Assistant Program Director
    BlueSkies for Children
    Oakland CA
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  • 2.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 5 days ago
    Can you explain where this emphasis on "lesson plan" is coming from? The usual lesson planning that you find in public school classrooms is not appropriate, in my opinion, in a center serving infants and toddlers as well as preschoolers and kindergarteners. There are many different ways to show what you are doing each week that do not follow the "plan book" type of planning that most people associate with lesson planning.

    For infants and toddlers, I would hope that the thinking about what to do would focus on developmental tasks and social development appropriate for these age groups.

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    Nora Krieger, PhD
    Associate Professor Emerita/Past Chair NJEEPRE
    Bloomfield College/NJ Educators Exploring the Practices of Reggio Emilia
    Highland Park, NJ
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  • 3.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 5 days ago
    Sure!
    The NAEYC accreditation criteria 2J.6 (show two lesson plans that help children appreciate visual arts from different cultures), 2J.7 (show two lesson plans that help children appreciate dramatic arts from different cultures), and 2J.8 (show two lesson plans that provide infants, toddlers, or twos with chances to explore and manipulate age-appropriate art materials) all require that we have lesson plans.
    Our curriculum isn't generally lesson plan based for children this young but because it is required to be re-accredited we are trying to figure out something appropriate to use.

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    Christa Edwards
    Assistant Program Director
    BlueSkies for Children
    Oakland CA
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  • 4.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 4 days ago
    I prefer to think of "plans for learning" rather than "lesson plans". I think this encourages thinking and being intentional about the experiences that are being provided for the children. (As a college professor, this language worked.)

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    Mira Berkley
    Quality Improvement Specialist
    QUALITYstarsNY
    Fredonia NY
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  • 5.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 3 days ago
    I completely agree with Mira. If the accreditation standards use the term Lesson Plan, it should probably be changed. It conveys a way of thinking about teaching young children that will steer teachers' thinking in the wrong direction. Plans for learning makes more sense and will lead teachers to think about "the why" of the experiences that they are planning for children. Teachers should be able to answer "the why" of what they are planning for children. As Mira said, thinking about planning as planning for learning should lead to intentionality when planning.

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    Nora Krieger, PhD
    Associate Professor Emerita/Past Chair NJEEPRE
    Bloomfield College/NJ Educators Exploring the Practices of Reggio Emilia
    Highland Park, NJ
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  • 6.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 2 days ago
    Mira,

    I really like that language - "plans for learning", rather than lesson plans.  It does lean more toward what we want to be, intentional!
    Thank you for sharing that.

    Tawanda Brown
    Family Child Care Provider
    Crestview, FL

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    Tawanda Brown
    Crestview FL
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  • 7.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 5 days ago
    Hello Everyone,
    A lesson plan that is theme based would be easier to adjust for the very young to K. It also gives you an opportunity to extend the children's learning into many areas within a developmental milestone approach to learning.I find that using theme based as well as project based lesson plans gives the children as well as the teacher room for rapid change within the scope of active learning. You can have room for teacher discussions in what the children are learning and how they are learning.

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    Milagros Neu
    Pre-K Teacher
    French American Academy
    Edgewater NJ
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  • 8.  RE: NAEYC Lesson Plans

    Posted 4 days ago
    Hi Christa,

    I have been a part of several reaccreditations for centers which serve birth through kindergarten. While the centers I worked in used weekly lesson plans, I do not believe it is "required" to be weekly. Bi-weekly sounds fine for infants, especially since most of the time our infant teachers would be doing similar activities over the course of a month. I'd like to mention that just because it is a new lesson plan doesn't mean that new additions to the environment or activities have to take place. The philosophy behind NAEYC is that we are providing children with developmentally appropriate and engaging experiences that enrich their days/lives. With that comes flexibility in the day and lessons, we must always respond to the children's wants and needs. Sometimes we plan active days and realize the children are not up for it, in that moment we adapt and select a different activity.

    The goal of lesson planning is to ensure that intentional experiences are being planned for all children. This can mean both structured and open-ended activities. Teachers take the time to plan activities and environment additions based on the needs and interest of the children. For example, there may be an infant who loves throwing balls and the teacher will plan to add different types of balls into the environment for them to explore. As that infants are touching/throwing the balls, the teacher will ask them questions about their experiences and practice self-talk. Another activity that can be done with balls is painting. Maybe the teacher plans an activity where there is paint on a paper and balls get bounced on top, or the infant paints their own ball.

    I'd be happy to answer any other questions you have about what I've written. I've worked with many infant teachers and have written my own infant lesson plans over the years.


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    Erin Daddio
    Carlsbad CA
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