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How to handle disruptive student

  • 1.  How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 5 days ago
    There is a student that throws boots and staff. She hits the teachers and tries to harm her peers. When she cannot have her way she throws chairs or anything she finds. She is constantly at the office, the parent is constantly called about the behavior. The director at this center said to hold her in your lap or have her by your side at all times. It's hard to attend to the rest of class while those episodes are going on. The owner keeps allowing the child in the classroom. The staff not director head a when policy for this type of behavioural. This is at a center my friends works at. And strategies out ideas to help the toddler our staff?


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    Elizabeth Willis
    Owner
    3 Sistas family homecare
    Riverdale GA
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  • 2.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 4 days ago
    Disruptive behaviors at home and in classrooms should always be handled appropriately and corrected. Most public school policies have zero tolerance policies to disruptive behaviors from students, while in private schools it depends on case by case basis. I would say at all times, disruptive behaviors should be discouraged in classrooms and schools by educators and aides and at home by parents. When we do nothing and watch such disruptive tendencies and behaviors in students -it leads to encouragement of such behaviors, bullying, rebellious attitude, hate and crimes. Thus, whenever such behavior is noticed it must be corrected. It can be sometimes corrected by talking to the student directly or by conferencing with the parents. If more severe action needs to be taken, then administrators should be involved in case of suspension or dismissal of the students. In most cases, when the matter is discussed, handled properly and corrected with the student on one on one basis it helps.

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    Dipanwita Ray, M.Ed.
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  • 3.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 4 days ago
    Thank you for your input. I do agree something has to be done by all parties. Staff has gotten on her level when speaking . They have also tried redirection. The parent has been advised on the behavior. A staff member allowed the parent too house on the closer without knowledge of the teacher's knowledge, the parent watched. She said nothing about the behavior but did reprimand the instructor for not doing enough. The owner and director told the staff to appease her with treats, I don't agree with rewarding behavior like that. I just hate to see a child going down that path and the staff struggle through this.

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    Elizabeth Willis
    Owner
    3 Sistas family homecare
    Riverdale GA
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  • 4.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 3 days ago
    Elizabeth,

    The advice given by Tiffany will establish for you and your team possible patterns in behavior both the child's and the caregivers. Once charting begins, look for time, specific triggers and detailed accounts of actions. Stay away from subjective accounts and be as objective as possible. Only chronicle what is seen and heard not what is  perceived to be happening and why> For example: Johnny walked over to Bill, raised his hand and hit Bill across. Bill's face has a hand-print on it. Instead of, Johnny was very angry when he hit Bill in the face.  Bill cried like a baby as he walked away. The first scenario does not contain any behavior interpretation or description.  I wo9uld like to recommend researching the concept of Executive function and how supporting this development helps the child control their own behavior- Autonomy support, mind-mindedness, etc.

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    Marsha Drew
    Assistant Director
    Stanford Arboretum Children Center
    San Francisco CA
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  • 5.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 4 days ago
    Hi Elizabeth,

    The thing to remember with these behaviors is that they are communicating a message.  Behaviors also serve a purpose of meeting our basic needs:  Survival, Love, Power/control, Freedom, and Fun (Glasser Choice Theory).  The thing that needs to happen is the behavior needs to be tracked using ABC Charts, Frequency Charts, and Anectdotal Records.  You will be using these forms to answer three questions:  (1) Why is this child behaving this way?  (2) What skills does the child need to learn?  and (3) How do you want to teach?  I always coach my teachers to think about Why-what-how!

    Target supports to reasons for behavior
    From the details you have provided in your post, the child could be struggling with managing emotions (throwing shoes) or simply using the behavior to get out of following your guidance. If it's managing emotions,  teaching the child appropriate ways to express emotions (in a calm down corner, mood thermometer, and things they can do squeeze ball, take deep breathes, etc.). If it's getting out of doing something they don't want to do (your directions), changing how you phrase things may help. Giving limited choices that leads them to want you want can reduce the resistance as the child feel like they are in "control". Another strategy is to use "First/then" language. "First you clean up, then we go outside". This teaches the child the sequence of things and gets them excited about what's coming next. If they upset because they want to finish playing with something, can they save it for later, bring it outside, etc.

    You see a lot of ifs in my response because it all depends on "Why". Knowing this is huge!

    I also encourage teachers to identify what basic needs are not being filled and to incorporate strategies to meet this needs into their routines and interactions. Potential needs to explore here are Survival (are they hungry/tired), freedom (do they want to make their own choices) and power (are they seeking out control).

    Let me me know if you have any questions. I write about this a lot on my blog if you need any ideas, tools, or resources.

    ~Tiffany
    ​​

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    Tiffany Smith
    Founder/Owner
    Teaching Foundations, LLC
    Columbia MD
    Tiffanyjsmith@teachingfoundationsllc.com
    Https://www.teachingfoundationsllc.com
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  • 6.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 4 days ago
    Thank you so much for that information. I will pass the knowledge along and I will also visit your blog. 


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    Elizabeth Willis
    Owner
    3 Sistas family homecare
    Riverdale GA
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  • 7.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 3 days ago
    Tiffany Jean Smith, Thank you for your discussion, I have a little boy that has started to constantly throw things in the classroom, he has also started to hit and kick. I knew I had to find out his why. However now I also see can be being disruptive because of power control. If you can please send me more information that would be great. Thank you Ms. Maxine

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    MAXINE WALTERS
    Winston Salem NC
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  • 8.  RE: How to handle disruptive student

    Posted 3 days ago
    Hello, we are going through a very similar situation here at the center I work. The child in the beginning was great. She would always listen and follow directions, but for about a month now we've been having some issues with her. She tends to run around the school, disrupt class, not listen. She has been hitting some friends with her shoes, etc. One thing we noticed is that the teacher sometimes can be very negative towards the student, and that also can provoke her from doing certain things. Children can sense all the negative vibes that's thrown at them. We've been in touch with the mother finding ways to help her child calm down since she's very hyper most of the time, and finding ways to help her in her day to day at school. But if she child becomes uncontrollable and dangerous the parent is called to come get them. We've been trying to find the best ways to have her be apart of the activities going on in the classroom, sometimes she does want more attention, but we can't necessarily be looking at her all the time since we do have 14 other kids in the classroom. We have found a few things that are of her interest, play dough, puzzles, coloring, so those are the things we're using to get her to be in the classroom, not running around, and also be able to stay around her friends and teacher, and also be learning.

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    Mery Ellen Paulichi
    DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL
    DANBURY CT
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