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Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

  • 1.  Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 16 days ago
    We have a 4.5 year old who was recently diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder and ADHD. We are looking for any strategies or tips or success  stories you all have to help him have a successful year.

    TIA!!

    ------------------------------
    Mary Kay Scanlon
    Program Director
    Holy Trinity Early Educaqtion Center
    Lenexa, KS
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 14 days ago
    HORIBLE! How do you treat diagnosis like that at this age? A biological approach is needed. This child's genes haven't learned to be calm and pay attention to the consequences of her behaviors. It will be important not to punish her for her learned behaviors. She will need to calmed by a trusted caregiver: one who has never punished or even been impatient with her. That will get her behavioral responses past her amygdala (the part of the brain that reacts impulsively to fear with fight or flight) to her prefrontal cortex (PFC) that can think the impulses from her environment through and choose better responses. I suggest that you find a neurobiological consultant as I'm sure this is new stuff for you. It's tough dealing with these behaviors, but they can be changed fairly quickly with the appropriate responses. Best wished.

    ------------------------------
    Jack Wright
    Child Development Consultant
    Success With Children
    St Ignatius MT
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 14 days ago

    Hi Mary Kay,
    You've already done one of my recommendations which is to reach out to others who've had a similar experience! Community is so important. It might be supportive and satisfying to connect with an ADHD and/or ODD parent group to see what's working for others or to survey different ways to understand the diagnosis. Maintaining it building a self care routine, whether in community or solo, is key! 


    I assume you have a formal eval. Does it list strategies or recommendations for your child? In my experience kids who've been diagnosed with ADHD or ODD respond positively to occupational therapy because there can be sensory integration overlap.

    Next, I always teach Collaborative Emotion Processing (for all children) to pair up with other strategies because our caregiver nervous systems are always communicating with the child's system. Sometimes our nervous systems have a pattern of getting heightened when there are signs that the child is approaching dysregulation. Adults who bring their calm will have more success supporting a child who is dysregulation or approaching dysreg. Co-regulation can be appropriate when kids haven't yet developed emotion processing skills no matter their age. Teaching and learning are effective when the child and adult can activate their prefrontal cortex (they are regulated and capable of higher level thinking). With big expressions there is often a big emotion underneath and if we engage early and calmly (pre-dysreg) then there will be an opportunity to help your child identify the emotion and develop coping strategies as opposed to coping mechanisms. 

    Finally, whichever strategies you end up using be sure to design them collaboratively, communicate them with all of your child's caregivers, and Connect teachers with specialists. Teachers should be able to name strategies that they are implementing in the classroom to scaffold and support your child's  access to relationships, curriculum, and meeting basic needs. 


    Our education systems (including teacher training programs) have not caught up with our values, so advocacy is always part of raising a child who doesn't fit the traditional and limited perception of what a student is. Your child is lucky to have a parent who is proactively working to understand and support their approach to learning! 

    Sincerely,
    Lauren



    ------------------------------
    Lauren Stauble
    Adjunct Faculty
    Bunker Hill Community College
    Weston MA
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 14 days ago
      |   view attached
    We take some of our kiddos out of the room before triggering transitions and specific times of the day for "body breaks". We have the attached sensory walk activities posted down the hallway. It's a positive experience for them and the children seem to really enjoy this time. Some are now able to tell us when they need a body break. I hope it helps a little!

    ------------------------------
    Barbara Laughlin
    Portage Private Industy Council
    Ravenna OH
    ------------------------------

    Attachment(s)



  • 5.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 6 days ago
    Thank you, Barbara! I'm an assistant teacher and have been trying very hard to redirect a preschooler who exhibits behavior that looks like ODD but has not been diagnosed officially. The child has used some materials that incorporate Trace the Tornado activity, but I haven't observed to assess if it calms him down. The Head Teacher does yoga with him, and he has requested that with me. However, I don't know the poses the HT has taught him, so I didn't want to deviate from that unless I know he is comfortable with change. I will share the link of the motor activities with the HT that you have provided.

    Do you have any suggestions on stopping inappropriate language from a child that might have sensory processing issues? The same child I described above has begun saying, "Shut up," to respond to classmates and teachers when he wants to stop conversations and dislikes. Other children have started to imitate him. In the beginning, I ignored it. Then, I tried to ask him why he says it, and he responded with "Shut up." I recently tried to replace "shut" with other words and more appropriate words to express his anger or anxiety, but it hasn't worked. Some were downright silly to get him to laugh.

    I have spoken with the HT, and we may read some picture books about anger, such as When Sophie Gets Angry, Really Really Angry by Molly Bang. Do you have any other suggestions for books about anger for preschoolers?

    Additionally, when the child asked when it was time to go home, I would tell him what is next and name the schedule. That seems to help calm down his anxiety. He knows the class schedule. We have been in school for 6 weeks, but when he feels out of sorts, I think, maybe, that's when he needs to hear or see a schedule. I have thought about creating a visual schedule for an ESL student who understands English but whose first language is not English. I have to talk with my HT, whose training and educational philosophy differs from the play-based curriculum.
    ------------------------------
    Ling Lee
    Evanston IL
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  • 6.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 14 days ago
    Good afternoon Mary,

    Thank you so much for your message.  It has help me to understand and started to research on ODD and ADHD.  We have a student in our Center who has a lot of behavior issues.  I'm searching to see how we can help our student also.   I have been praying for this student.  I also  want to help him so he could be success.

    Thank you for your information.

    ------------------------------
    Nelida Rosado
    Orlando FL
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 11 days ago
    Hi Mary Kay,

    Oppositional Defiant Disorder is a major diagnosis and not usually given at such an early age. The details matter. Thus, my recommendation is to ensure the child has as many supports that are provided from special education and to work with the special education team to develop a good treatment plan that the whole team agrees on and then implements as consistently as possible across team members. Then adjust the plan as needed. Coordination and consistency across the team, ideally with parents on board, is the key to success in my experience. Feel free to chat with me off line if desired scott.mesh@losninos.com

    ------------------------------
    Scott Mesh, CEO
    Los Niños Training, NYC
    www.youngchildexpo.com
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 10 days ago
    Hello -
    In our preschool, we have found that children who demonstrate defiant, oppositional, or what is typically considered ADD or ADHD behaviors are often expressing anxiety with the current situation or expectations, or may be acting out stress from another part of their life. A conversation with the parents about home life routines and relationships can shed light on the student's behaviors in the classroom, and together you can make modifications at school and home, or parents can seek professional help through family therapy or occupational therapy to ease the emotional load on the child. Another tool we have used with success is a visual schedule with pictures of the day's activities. You can purchase software to make these (ie. Board Maker) or just find clipart that represents your daily schedule - drop off, circle time, playground, etc. Seeing the boundaries of the day (start to finish) and either removing the activity pieces as they are completed or crossing them off a paper chart, gives a measure of control to an anxious child. Parents can do the same for home routines. There have also been times when a child's behavior shows us that they are not placed with the right peer group, or perhaps attending a 5-day program is too much for them, and making a change to another class or reducing the time spent in attendance relieves their stress. The behavior isn't always a reflection of that moment - - it could be something else entirely that a child cannot verbalize.

    ------------------------------
    Tina Summers
    Director
    Preschool in the Village
    Amherst, NH
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hi Tina,

    I like to put myself into these children's shoes, and thinking how frustrating not been able to express what my needs and means.
    This will remind me to be patience and gain back my repose.  Thank for your wonderful sharing.


    ------------------------------
    PATSY OH
    Principal
    LAVENDER MEADOWS ACADEMY PTE LTD
    SINGAPORE
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago
    Hi Tina and Patsy,
    Yes yes yes...the behavior is communication to something else that the child cannot verbalize...we have to be the detectives to figure out what is causing the behavior...

    ------------------------------
    Joanie Calem
    Music and Inclusion Specialist
    Sing Along
    Columbus, OH
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago

    Tina:
    Excellent points and suggestions.  It's always good to consider anxiety, stressors, and how to lessen stress.  Of course each child will have different stressors and different things that help them to lesses stress.  For some it might be a tight hug; others might need more physical space around them.  And we don't always get to know the cause.  A child might have a wonderful home life and supportive family and still carry a high internal stress load.  For some of us, anxiety, not necessarily as a diagnosis but as a feeling, is biological and inborn.
    The work of Dr. Stuart Shanker and Mona Delahooke has been helpful to me in thinking about stress, how to mitigate it, and how to support self-regulation in each child (and adult).



    ------------------------------
    Aren Stone
    she/her/hers
    Child Development Specialist
    The Early Years Project
    Cambridge, MA
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago
    Thank you for sharing that.  My son was diagnosed with ADHD and ODD in Pre K and also Kinder.  He is in middle school now and is diagnosed with GAD.  I can see that now as we have gone through this life journey.  Charts and ques works wonder for him.

    ------------------------------
    Yolanda Traylor
    Director
    Day School at First Church
    Little Rock AR
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago
    Thanks, Ms Tina for sharing.  We need to put ourselves into a child's shoe, where we cannot express what we want and displayed behaviour to convey our message.  Then, we can calm and repose when we experience stress in taking care of them.



    Hi Ms Yolanda,

    What does GAD stands for?

    ------------------------------
    PATSY OH
    Principal
    LAVENDER MEADOWS ACADEMY PTE LTD
    SINGAPORE
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago
    GAD is general anxiety disorder.

    ------------------------------
    Yolanda Traylor
    Director
    Day School at First Church
    Little Rock AR
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago
    Thanks

    ------------------------------
    PATSY OH
    Principal
    LAVENDER MEADOWS ACADEMY PTE LTD
    SINGAPORE
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 4 days ago
    Hello Mary Kay,

    Since every behavior has an environmental function that maintains it, I'll suggest you consult with any available behavior analyst in your district or school. They will be able to complete a functional analysis based upon which a treatment will be recommended.

    In the meantime, try reinforcing other behaviors that are not oppositional.

    Kwabena Agyei Barima

    ------------------------------
    Kwabena Agyei Barima
    Teacher
    Lorton VA
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hi Mary Kay,
    I think a few people have already mentioned this, but I often see what looks like ODD when the underlying condition is actually Sensory Processing Disorder, and a difficulty handling "typical" classroom life because of difficulties processing what is going on around the child.  Covid and all of the changes and upheavals going on now are also contributing to children's difficulties.  I would see if you can get ahold of a sensory check list and see if it applies to this child.  With some sensory friendly strategies in place, and lot of the defiant behavior is likely to diminish.

    ------------------------------
    Joanie Calem
    Music and Inclusion Specialist
    Sing Along
    Columbus, OH
    ------------------------------



  • 18.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 9 days ago
    Thank you all for your help.  So many excellent suggestions!  I am meeting with the classroom teachers tomorrow and feel so much better prepared. I might be reaching out to some of you individually in the next few weeks.

    Mary Kay

    ------------------------------
    Mary Kay Scanlon
    Program Director
    Holy Trinity Early Educaqtion Center
    Lenexa, KS
    ------------------------------



  • 19.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago

    Hi Mary Kay,

     

    Since there was so much interest in this post I wonder if you might consider sharing any successful strategies in the future with us.

     

    My thoughts are that many suggestions here might be helpful. In addition, just like when you go to a doctor for an issue the first thing is a good diagnosis before the treatment. This is how I've approached issues like this over the years. First assess, then address. Once it's clear what is happening, and understanding why, as much as possible, then the treatment plan including strategies, people involved, methods can be tailored to the situation. I thought the questions you have received as helpful, such as is it sensory processing, or what other possible cause there might be. With a good thorough evaluation with good evaluators then you and the family may be able to zero in on an effective treatment plan. In my experience I have seen many misdiagnoses, wrong diagnoses, under treatment, over treatment and more. I know that many people are pro special ed and many are con. My suggestion is to use services available, free ones like special ed. I work in Special Ed and see many amazing therapists and of course there are those that are not amazing.  Whomever you work with my suggestion is to do your best to find competent and effective diagnosticians and therapists. I have seen so many amazing success stories when I child is properly understood (with a good diagnosis), and then with effective intervention. I've seen those who never were understood and suffered without progress. Ping me offline if you want to run anything by me. All the best on this very important moment in this child's life. You can make a huge difference. As we say, the earlier the better.

    Scott Mesh






  • 20.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 8 days ago

    I keep hearing "diagnosis." We need to be careful that we don't miss understanding the child when we label them in any way. Yes, we need assessment, but we need to reconsider diagnosis in my opinion. 

     






  • 21.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 6 days ago
    Jack,
    While I don't disagree with you that we need to be more accepting of neuro-diversity, most often the only way to get help for a child is with a diagnosis. It would take an overhaul of both the educational system and healthcare system in order to get funding to help neuro-diverse children the specialized help they need and deserve.

    ------------------------------
    Heather Finnegan
    Preschool Teacher
    Our Redeemer Lutheran Church with School
    Delavan WI
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 6 days ago
    Heather, thank you. I think you were helpful.

    ------------------------------
    Jack Wright
    Child Development Consultant
    Success With Children
    St Ignatius MT
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 5 days ago
    Diagnosis can be interpreted in many ways. We do need to try to figure out where the oppositional behavior is coming, the triggers. Then we need to work with the child's family to help with the behaviors. It cannot be solved only by the teacher and other professionals in the school. It has to be a partnership.

    ------------------------------
    Nora Krieger, PhD
    Associate Professor Emerita/Past Chair NJEEPRE
    Bloomfield College/NJ Educators Exploring the Practices of Reggio Emilia
    Highland Park, NJ
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 4 days ago
    Nora Jean, I couldn't agree more.  I'm a pediatrician and child psychiatrist, mother of four, grandmother of two. Oppositional defiant is behavior that communicates that something is amiss somewhere in the child's life and it does take a team to sort it out.  I don't believe in it as a "diagnosis" except, unfortunately, as a way to get insurance to help pay for help.


    ------------------------------
    Teresa Hargrave MD MPH FAAP
    Emeritus Associate Professor of Psychiatry
    SUNY-UMU
    Syracuse NY
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 4 days ago
    Teresa, thank you for you comment re: diagnosis and insurance.

    ------------------------------
    Jack Wright
    Child Development Consultant
    Success With Children
    St Ignatius MT
    ------------------------------



  • 26.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 4 days ago
    Yes Teresa I was going to echo Jack's words...as someone who wears the hat of parent of someone who has a long list of diagnoses AND the hat of an educator, I know that diagnoses help in the world of insurance and access to therapies and supports, but they are often best put aside when working with the actual child, because ironically the label often blinds the caretakers to seeing and understanding what else might be going on for the child.  Also, many of these diagnoses are just about managing behaviors instead of rooting out the cause and potentially healing the cause which then allows the behaviors to heal.

    ------------------------------
    Joanie Calem
    Music and Inclusion Specialist
    Sing Along
    Columbus, OH
    ------------------------------



  • 27.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 3 days ago
    I wholeheartedly agree!!!! As someone with ADHD and anxiety and children with an alphabet soup of diagnoses, a label is just for getting the appropriate treatment paid for. I'm in my last semester of my Master's program and I'm taking an advanced ABA class. One of the tenets is that all behavior serves a purpose. If a behavior is challenging then we need to determine what purpose that behavior serves that child and privide an appropriate replacement behavior. It requires observations and documentation to figure out every thing. I also echo the suggestion of using the services of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

    ------------------------------
    Heather Finnegan
    Preschool Teacher
    Our Redeemer Lutheran Church with School
    Delavan WI
    ------------------------------



  • 28.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 4 days ago
    Of course, Nora, I agree that it takes a team to support anyone with inappropriate behavior or language issues. The topic of ODD came into my email feed, and it seemed to make sense to me that one of the preschoolers in my class may have it. I've emailed my HT about finding out more about the child's history and what the previous teachers have done to support him. Hopefully, the HT will learn more about the child's medical and developmental history when she speaks with the parents.

    ------------------------------
    Ling Lee
    Evanston IL
    ------------------------------



  • 29.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 3 days ago
    I believe environment and context can make a huge difference. It is natural for adults to jump to surface conclusions with inaccurate labels. It is important to assess a child and more importantly, first, their situation correctly. Filling in any holes of a child's understanding a lot of times can be seen to irradiate a behavior completely which tells me it was not ever the child but the context.

    As early child educators it is our role to make sure a child gains clarity in their learning. It is equally important for us as adults to maintain the realization and vitality having an open mind, couples with the humility that we as adults make mistakes and misjudgments as well. Admitting our mistakes models an authoritative, healthy communication to a child.

    Labels are not something to take lightly and it is a much needed area for deeper seeking than surface made conclusions. A better approach would be to observe the root and if any holes of misconception are in a child's reality. These are all important considerations and a primary role of a good teacher. Supportive adults need to make sure their observations are not taken out of context and take the whole child into consideration or else dangerous and inappropriate conclusions could be reached.

    An inappropriate label can easily be made without proper percepective. Empathizing and understanding the whole picture with young children is vital in my opinion before jumping to conclusions with labels.

    ------------------------------
    Rebecca Marks
    Lithia FL
    ------------------------------



  • 30.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 2 days ago
    I completely agree with your comments above!! My question is have you encountered children that are being "labeled" with this?  IF so what have been some of the causes that you have seen trigger this behavior. Also do you have any tips to dealing with this. I have been trying consistency, but am finding that once he figures the redirection he is making that an issue and I have to find another. I am running out of options.

    ------------------------------
    Jennifer Schrock
    Provider/Owner
    By Grace Daycare
    Hillsboro WI
    ------------------------------



  • 31.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 2 days ago
    The child I worked with did not have the label, but her brother did, and she acted like he did. Mom was going to look into therapy for her, but then the COVID shutdown hit.
    I found a picture schedule to be helpful along with using timers. Then it wasn't me telling the student that time was up or which activity was next. I also use red/green choices from Pocket of Preschool, available on Teacher Pay Teachers. I wear a ring of the mini green choice cards on my ID badge and use that to give the student choices. I also learned to state something once, then not engage with the argument from the student that usually followed. I didn't respond and did my best to not look at her either.

    This student responded well to positive attention when she was displaying appropriate behavior. Each child behaves in ways that "work" for them. You need to use an ABC chart (antecedent/behavior/consequence) to determine if the child is trying to get something, avoid something, or has sensory needs that they are trying to meet.

    This is why I suggest consulting with a Behavior specialist. They are trained to determine the root cause of a behavior and determine an intervention plan that will help replace the challenging behavior with an appropriate behavior while still meeting the need the child has. 


    ------------------------------
    Heather Finnegan
    Preschool Teacher
    Our Redeemer Lutheran Church with School
    Delavan WI
    ------------------------------



  • 32.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 2 days ago
    I would be very careful labeling a preschool child ODD. They are so young and do not have the coping skills to tolerate all of the noise, lights, and intense social interactions. Whenever a child is displaying what we call negative behaviors, there is always a reason for the behavior and as teachers we must be there for the child so we begin to understand what the source of the behavior is or what the behavior does for the child. Each behavior has a reason and we must sort through the experiences to find ways to help the child. Words of wisdom I have in my office " Thinking of children as behaving badly predisposes us to think of punishment. Thinking of your child as struggling to handle something difficult encourages you to help them through their distress." Help this child through her distress on a daily basis until she becomes more adept at understanding what is happening and how she can respond.

    ------------------------------
    Christine Webster, MA
    Director
    Brazosport College Children's Center
    Lake Jackson TX
    ------------------------------



  • 33.  RE: Oppositional Defiant Disordsr

    Posted 2 days ago
    I still believe environment can play a major roll. Once Covid-19 dies down, with the availability of regular schedules coming back, will provide many the evidence of what you will find to be a normal regulated behavior in a child with contributing nature. The times provide limited environments which unfortunately affects what encompasses a well rounded, healthy child.

    Every person, nonetheless children, need friends outside of their family and home life. In fact this is the top predictor for longevity in older adults. I can't imagine what a child might be lacking without this proper balance in their daily life, no matter how loving their family might be. It is a different needed structure.

    ------------------------------
    Rebecca Marks
    Lithia FL
    ------------------------------