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What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

  • 1.  What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-02-2020 09:57 PM
    To those of you who have been open over the last couple of months and have at least 6-8 kids in a room....
    • What has that looked like in actual practice to try and keep kids 6 feet apart? 
    • What does it look like to keep kids from sharing materials?
    • What has focusing so much attention on hygiene and cleaning done to your ability to observe and document?
    • What has focusing energy on rearranging class spaces and morning symptom & temperature checks done to your ability to be creative?
    • What are you doing that is working and keeping you in step with CDC guidelines?
    • What is impossible and ridiculous to even attempt?
    Thanks for any time you can give to these questions.  I'm sure you're busy as can be and know how valuable your time is.

    ------------------------------
    James Mitchell
    Teacher
    Silver Spring Nursery School
    Takoma Park MD
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-04-2020 07:48 AM
    Hello,
    I will just address the issue of masks for now.  I developed a social story specific to our home and gave to each family along with the new changes which included masks in the home.  Because I sew, I made special "germ fighting hero" masks for each child with their initial (very large) sewed right onto the masks.  We also worked out a place to safety place the masks when we go outside and don't wear the masks.  The masks are kept here and washed each night.  So far (1 week), the masks have not been an issue and everyone is keeping them on.  They pretend to be super germ fighters and send germs running.
    For what its worth.
    Joann

    ------------------------------
    Joann Gansen
    Dubuque IA
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 07-01-2020 05:37 PM
    Hello,
    For us have been very hard to keep children wearing mask, the weather lately has been very hot, and they trend to take it off. We added a couple of indoor  area to play and keep them with physical distance to play. Water day frequently is a great option to spend more time outside by cleaning toys and equipment  with enough soap to say bye-bye germs.

    ------------------------------
    Vilma Oliva
    Sarasota FL
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-04-2020 07:50 AM
    Hello!  I believe each center has to do what is best for that center during this time.  One thing that we have tried to focus on is the whole child.  Yes, physical safety is very important.  However, we don't want to neglect the cognitive, emotional, social, or spiritual part of the child.  We have not implemented social distancing in our classrooms.  We have asked parents not to enter classrooms, and we have created a one way flow of traffic in our building.  Parents and staff are also wearing facemasks.  We have been blessed enough to have extra staff to go in each classroom twice a day to clean and disinfect toys when the children are on the playground or in the running room.  This allows the teachers to teach and not worry about cleaning.  We also have been checking temperatures in the office as children come in so teachers do not have to worry about that either.  Children do wash hands when they enter their classrooms.  I know that not every center is equipped with the staffing and space that we are so it will look different for everyone.  I hope this helps!

    ------------------------------
    Elizabeth Weller
    Director
    Park Place Children's Center
    Anderson IN
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-05-2020 04:09 AM

    We are trying t to re-open end of August and are frying to create a safe environment.
    What are the cleaning products that are used to disinfect toys? Is the solution part Clorox and water good enough?  Are you guys mixing the groups or are the teachers pretty much staying isolated in their own room? What do you do at playtime outdoors?
    Furthermore, are parents signing waivers in case one child gets sick to prevent liabilities ? I would appreciate all the advice I can get. 



    ------------------------------
    Vera Chang-Garcia
    Teacher
    Beyond Pre-K in Spanish
    Culver City CA
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-05-2020 08:38 AM
    Hello!  We are using soapy water and then Quat Sanitizer to disinfect the toys.  From what I have read from our state licensing and the CDC, bleach water is also acceptable.  We are trying our absolute best to keep teachers isolated with the same kids in the same rooms.  All of our classes are eating meals in their rooms so they are not combining in the cafeteria.  We are having someone go out to the playgrounds once a day to disinfect the railing on play equipment,  tricycles, etc.  We have not chosen to have parents sign any waivers.

    ------------------------------
    Elizabeth Weller
    Director
    Park Place Children's Center
    Anderson IN
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-06-2020 05:09 PM
    Aloha Vera,
    We reopened on June 1, and made it through our first week!  We have purchased a new product for disinfecting that is effective against Covid-19 according to EPA.  It is TEC Foster First Disinfectant.  I prefer not to make my employees use bleach and water, because it ruins clothes.  Also, the smell is not so great!  In Hawaii, we are not allowed to mix the groups at all.  Ratio for each group is 9:1.  If you have less children, you can have more adults, but we're not supposed to have more than 10 in a group.  We had to shorten outside playtime to half hour increments, because each group has to play separately.  We have five groups.  The teachers are supposed to stay with their same group  throughout the day.  Our biggest issue right now is figuring out how to do before and after school care, since we can't mix the groups.  We don't have enough staff for the extra long day.
    We were told that we could do a liability waiver for the parents to sign, but that it wouldn't hold up if they could prove their child caught c-19 in school.  We have not decided yet whether or not we will do one.  We also thought we should do one for the employees.  We're waiting for more legal input.
    Hope this helps!  Take care and stay safe!

    ------------------------------
    Catherine Awong
    Director
    Mililani Presbyterian Preschool
    Mililani, HI, USA
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-06-2020 07:02 PM
    Catherine,
    You helped me tremendously.  I work as a contractor for the City of Culver City.  They said I need to ask for our own legal representation concerning Covid-19.  I think we need to take a leap of faith. Be as cautious as possible, and knowing what others are experiencing will help me be prepared.
    Have a great weekend!

    ------------------------------
    Vera Chang-Garcia
    Teacher
    Beyond Pre-K in Spanish
    Culver City CA
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-04-2020 10:09 AM
    We have continued to be open during the pandemic. One of the things we have had to adjust is a strict health policy. Children basically have to be well enough to come to school.  Another thing is having some mental health time for the teachers. It has been a roller coaster of emotions. We have infant, toddler and twos mixed ages in the classroom with 8 children maximum and 2 teachers in each classroom. We had low attendance for a while. It is difficult to keep children six feet apart especially when they are infant, toddlers, and twos. We use the three step method if a child puts a toy int heir mouth we put it in the cleaning bin. We have stopped brushing teeth and we have to serve children in paper plates. We also use gloves and wash hands constantly. Our hours of operation have changed to ensure we have enough time at closing to disinfect and clean in more detail. We are not allowing parents in the building, we take children temp every morning with a no touch thermometer. We use masks at drop of and pick up. The teachers have started wearing them throughout day. This is very challenging I will say every day we seem to learn different ways to have more precaution.

    ------------------------------
    Paloma Cisneros
    Acting Program Director
    Tony Reyes Bilingual CDC
    Oklahoma City OK
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-04-2020 11:30 AM
    We stayed open and some of it has been difficult.  The temperatures and drop off/pick up can be hectic, but families have been very cooperative.  The children have gotten use to this routine and it has been fun to watch.  The social distancing is difficult as children are social by nature and always want to be right by each other.  One teacher came up with, "spreading your wings" as a reminder that we are too close.  It has been hard for the teachers, circle time has been an item as has reading stories with a mask on.  We have had no positive tests in the building and the families and staff have been very good about staying home when ill and following our travel restrictions although they forget when reminded.  We are working on all things, are we perfect?  No.  But we work hard to get better every day.

    ------------------------------
    Pamela Ramp
    Director
    Banana Bunch CLC
    Rapid City SD
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-05-2020 09:42 AM
    Pamela,
    When we first started talking about reopening, it was an eye opener as far as putting all the logistics together to make that happen. We had teachers come and remove all of the soft toys in their classrooms or they would need to be cleaned daily. all shared sensory items were removed and replaced with their own personal boxes. The teachers also put down nameplates to remind the children of where they should sit anytime they are doing seated work.  We had them put a bucket in each room labeled dirty. Any toys in that bucket are cleaned with soap and water daily. Our staff now come through a different entrance and get their temps taken each morning as well as the afternoon staff. Our teachers arrive at 7am and parents begin to arrive at 715. Prior to that reopening on June 1st we had asked each parent when they would be dropping off and picking up their child. A document was created and given to each teacher. The parents came only into the lobby where we had two check-in stations. One for our Infants, crawlers and toddlers and a second station for the 2, 3, and 4 year old. The staff at the stations took each child's temp before entering. We have signs posted reminding the 6 foot distance rule. Hand sanitizer placed out for parents. The teachers were waiting at the door to take the children to their classrooms. Because of all the things infants require in a day, we have allowed those parents to come inside after answering 4 questions and taking their temps. They meet the teacher at the classroom door and fill out their daily feeding times. Each child and staff wash their hands upon entering the classroom. We made individual boxes for each child with their names on it. Inside we put chalk, crayons, markers, writing pads, playdough etc. that they will be able to use throughout the day. Our school has made a new playground schedule to allow for the cleaning in between the classes waiting 10 minutes between. We also have a big courtyard where we listed times for each class where they had yet another option to get outside. On the days when it is raining, we have a kids yoga program where each class can use during their listed playground time so they can get some needed activity. We have begun using a lot more mindfulness activities. Only one classroom in the hallways at a time. The assistant from each classroom will look out before entering the hallway. The teachers have taped off their rooms for each center and a brief mini lesson on that first day was explained to the children. Our state says we can have 20 in a class but because we normally have our classrooms at 13:2 each except the infant rooms which are 9:2, it wasn't a problem staying on the low side of the 13 on average of 7 or 8 per classroom. Normally we are over 140 students, but we have 92 that are coming back. Now saying that, a few are only coming like 3 days a week thus keeping those numbers to a manageable number. Students eat breakfast and lunch in the classes as well. We have installed the automatic soap dispensers on the walls. For nap time, each child has a nap mat that is placed on their cot with their name. When the children get up, the cot is wiped down and the mat is placed in a bag and hung below their cubby. When it is time for the students to go home, one staff member mans the lobby area with a walkie talkie. They relay to our Admin assistant and she will call the classroom and the child is brought to the parent. The teacher already knows the general time for each student to go home so they have their students toileted and hands washed and ready to go. Children bring their own water bottles. It has all been a lot of work but the transition has been much smoother than we expected. Communication is the key. Our staff, parents and students all knew what to expect. Yes we have had a few tears, but each day it has gotten better.  We wish you all the best for those looking to reopen. Blessings.

    ------------------------------
    Mary Hayes
    Director
    ChristSchool
    Dalton GA
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-09-2020 01:29 AM
    Thank you for the idea of "spreading your wings" to help teach that concept of social distancing to young children.  I am just beside myself wondering how we're going back to school in the fall.  Our school district is choosing the extreme tier where we have to have desks in our classrooms- all classrooms- no carpets or cloth seating.  And then my principal told me yesterday that children would not be allowed to share toys and they were taking manipulatives away.  I was angry all day yesterday and expressed to my principal why have preschool if children could stay at home and play freely with toys as opposed to sitting at a desk and not being able to move around. I'm being told that we don't have a choice because the reason our superintendent is taking the extreme tier is because the school district fears getting sued if a student gets Covid after being at school.  I'm trying to think of creative ways to address this like creating a storage container for each child with materials for them.

    ------------------------------
    Nicolette Theodore-Moad
    Preschool Teacher
    Burlington Community School District
    W Burlington IA
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-09-2020 01:33 AM
    Thank you for the idea of "spreading your wings" to help teach that concept of social distancing to young children.  I am just beside myself wondering how we're going back to school in the fall.  Our school district is choosing the extreme tier where we have to have desks in our classrooms- all classrooms- no carpets or cloth seating.  And then my principal told me yesterday that children would not be allowed to share toys and they were taking manipulatives away.  I was angry all day yesterday and expressed to my principal why have preschool if children could stay at home and play freely with toys as opposed to sitting at a desk and not being able to move around. I'm being told that we don't have a choice because the reason our superintendent is taking the extreme tier is because the school district fears getting sued if a student gets Covid after being at school.  I'm trying to think of creative ways to address this like creating a storage container for each child with materials for them.

    ------------------------------
    Nicolette Theodore-Moad
    Preschool Teacher
    Burlington Community School District
    W Burlington IA
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-09-2020 03:00 PM
    Aloha Nicolette,
    I feel your frustration!  We did the separate bins with manipulatives, books, and art supplies for each child.  We have been open one week and two days, and so far itʻs working.  I canʻt ever imagine preschoolers sitting in desks though!  Thatʻs outrageous!  Perhaps your superintendent can seek legal advice on liability waivers for the parents to sign.
    Best of luck!
    Aloha,

    ------------------------------
    Catherine Awong
    Director
    Mililani Presbyterian Preschool
    Mililani, HI, USA
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-10-2020 01:09 AM
    Aloha Catherine!
    Thank you for your encouraging words.  I will suggest the waivers but I don't think it's going to help. I think it's going to be inevitable someone is going to get sick, staff or children.  And I'm not saying that to be cruel but we don't have a vaccine for this yet and we're going back into school where children are not going to be allowed to go outside and pretty much be in their classrooms for the entire day.  I really don't see how we're going to have kids in our schools unless parents need to have them in school because of their work situations.  I'm glad that the individual bins worked for you because I had the same thought before I had read people's posts on what they were doing.

    I really am trying to stay positive and continue to provide a safe and loving learning environment for our preschoolers.

    Hope you continue to have safe and healthy days:)  Nicolette

    ------------------------------
    Nicolette Theodore-Moad
    Preschool Teacher
    Burlington Community School District
    W Burlington IA
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-12-2020 02:08 AM
    I understand your frustrations. I have been working in emergency childcare with preschoolers all this time, We are doing regular sanitizations, we have created bins for every child and divided toys they like into them like lego pieces,megnatiles, snap cubes, etc. Children can use only things from their own bins when playing. We keep rotating the materials frequently. As far as social distancing is concerned it is impossible with young children.
    Amina.

    ------------------------------
    Amina Sajjad
    Redmond WA
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-13-2020 01:58 AM

    Hello Amina,

    it's certainly going to take time to adjust. As you said in your last statement, social/physical distancing is impossible with young children. My current research on what the 'new norm' in preschools is, around the world, definitely shows that physical distancing is not really possible as the children require a lot of hands on support.

    A few key factors for some preschools that have reopened successfully are:

    • minimizing the risk of transmission from the onset
    • enabling safe and conscientious interaction between all staff and children as well as visitors
    • high levels of good hygiene
    • maintaining an updated contact register to monitor all people that have accessed your setting on a daily basis
    I'm in the process of compiling a manual for reopening nurseries/preschools. If this is something that may be of interest to you please let me know via email and I will add your name to the list. There will be a nominal fee for the manual and 30% of all revenue will be donated to a Preschool for orphans in Malawi.

    We also have a free checklist for ECE leaders that may be useful to you. You can email us for a copy.

    all the very best wishes

    ------------------------------
    Patricia Mezu
    Professional Minds FZ LLC
    www.prminds.org
    CONTENTWWORDS@ZOHOMAIL.COM
    ------------------------------



  • 18.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-10-2020 01:52 PM
     The crisis that are going  on around our country has made it clear that we must fundamentally rethink and readjust the ways we educate young children and support families in the United States." We have to work  together and support each other, now more  than ever for a better future for our children, and our country. 





  • 19.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-05-2020 12:26 PM
    Our state has decided it is not realistic nor developmentally appropriate to expect kids to socially distance from each other. Therefore we just have small groups (3-6 kids per group) and they never mix with other groups but they can be within 6 feet of the others in their group.

    ------------------------------
    Bridget Connor-Feldbaum
    Director
    Alfred G. Rayner Learning Center
    Baton Rouge LA
    ------------------------------



  • 20.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-05-2020 01:03 PM
    Bridget,
    We too feel the same as the expectation of social distancing for kids are almost next to impossible in a classroom. We have signs posted in our lobby for the parents but the kids are kept with their own class and not mixing them has still allowed them to be with their friends and have that time to socialize. In our classes the teacher will still have group time but it is done with 3-4 at a time.

    ------------------------------
    Mary Hayes
    Director
    ChristSchool
    Dalton GA
    ------------------------------



  • 21.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-09-2020 05:16 PM
    Hi,

    This is my first time posting to this forum.  I am a Pre-K4 Teacher in a Pre-K through Grade 8 Catholic School in Waltham, MA.  We have been teaching virtually since March 16th.  A question came up in our virtual staff meeting today.  Some of our children come five days a week, but quite a few select what days they will come, either two, three, or four.  So, some days I have 20 children in my class and other days I might have 14.  What do you do when someone in your Monday group gets sick and everyone has to quarantine, but not all the children were there that day.  Does the administration have to hire a substitute teacher for the six kids who don't come on Mondays, but are in school on Tuesdays?  We are also trying to figure out if we can offer after care when the normal school day ends. We are just putting together a task force to figure out how our school will work in September.  The State has released guidelines for daycare centers which were allowed to open this week.  Still waiting for DOE guidelines for the public schools in September.  Any insight as to how you are handling the number of days a child can attend would be most helpful.  Thank you!

    Donna Cantera-Davis
    Pre-K4B Teacher
    Our Lady's Academy
    Waltham, MA

    ------------------------------
    Donna Cantera-Davis
    Arlington MA
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-11-2020 09:58 AM
    Donna,

    With everything that is going on, I would say that there need to be set days when children come to the center.  Parents should understand that this is for the health and safety of all children.  The schedules should be set until after the risk of the pandemic has passed.  This way, in the event of the scenario above, you will know exactly who is to be quarantined and you can put a plan in place for other children who have not been exposed.  IMO

    ------------------------------
    Deandra Wimberley
    Le Bonheur Comm Health & Well-Being
    Memphis TN
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-12-2020 10:16 AM
    Thank you so much for all your replies.  It does give me a lot to think about when creating scheduling for the fall.  I love this forum.

    Thanks,

    Donna Cantera-Davis

    ------------------------------
    Donna Cantera-Davis
    Arlington MA
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-14-2020 08:39 AM
    Yes, I completely agree, Donna. I am in MA. And the way I am interpreting the latest version of the EEC regulations (came out just this past Fri, 6/12/20) is that the groups should be as set as possible. So if you have children coming 5 days a week and some come 4,3,2, etc. days, those families would need to pick what those days are and stick to them during this time (at least during first 2 months--July and Aug). So your groups can be set and you can appropriately track any illness and do contact tracing according to how those groups were set up. Also, if you allow families to do part of a day, they should pick consistent hours within that day. So 9-12 or something like that versus coming at 8 some days or staying til 1 on other day.s This also helps with tracing. This would really go for any child. So having families commit to a consistent schedule such as M, W, F from say 9-3 or T,Th from 9-1 kind of thing, is most effective. There is hope that by Sept the EEC (MA) regulations will be able to be lightened a bit and some of these restrictions may relax by then. But there is no way of truly knowing that right now. Since we just started lightening social distancing in general over the past few weeks in MA, cases have started to rise again. So in Gov Baker's conf on 6/12, he stated that if that trend continued, he would have to become more restrictive again.

    Below is a link to the MA EEC webpage that has the latest requirements, all the reopening (required) docs, an FAQ and other really great info.
    https://eeclead.force.com/apex/EEC_ChildCareEmergencyReopenInfo



    ------------------------------
    Caroline Yoder
    Caroline Yoder
    Newburyport MA
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-25-2020 09:22 AM
    Hi Caroline. Thank you for your response. I work at a small private pre-school in MA and we are struggling to determine max. capacity in our classroom. We will have 2 teachers and were wondering if we could go about 10 students. We have read all of the literature from the EEC and cannot really find this answer. We are also wondering how other schools are handling the logistics of drop-off once the children have been appropriately screened. Are parents entering the building and removing coats, etc. to prepare for the day or does a staff member take the child directly from the parent at the door. We would love to hear what others are doing. Thank you.

    Gay O'Hanlon
    The Village School
    Milton, MA

    ------------------------------
    Gay O'Hanlon
    Lead Teacher
    The Village School
    Milton MA
    ------------------------------



  • 26.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-26-2020 08:59 AM

    Gay:

    This is from the new reopening regulations.  Preschool ratio is 1-10-, but they highly recommend 2-10.  No more than 10 in each PS classroom.

    Age

    Staff to Child Ratio

    Maximum Group Size (Children)

    Infant

    Birth 14 months

    1:3 2:7

    7

    Toddler

    15 32 months

    1:4 2:9

    9

    Preschool

    ≥33 months, but not yet attending Kindergarten

    1:10***

    10

    School Age*

    Attending Kindergarten+

    1:10

    10

    Family Child Care and Multi-Age**
    All Age Groups

    1:6 2:8

    8


    I couldn't find anyplace that says parents must drop off at the door.  But it does define parent volunteers as non-essential and not allowed.  All of the centers I work with are having drop off at the front door--outside when possible--after the health check. I suggest calling your licensor.  They should be a good resource at this time.
    All the best on reopening!



    Gay wrote:
    Hi Caroline. Thank you for your response. I work at a small private pre-school in MA and we are struggling to determine max. capacity in our classroom. We will have 2 teachers and were wondering if we could go about 10 students. We have read all of the literature from the EEC and cannot really find this answer. We are also wondering how other schools are handling the logistics of drop-off once the children have been appropriately screened. Are parents entering the building and removing coats, etc. to prepare for the day or does a staff member take the child directly from the parent at the door. We would love to hear what others are doing. Thank you.



    ------------------------------
    Aren Stone
    she/her/hers
    Child Development Specialist
    The Early Years Project
    Cambridge, MA
    ------------------------------



  • 27.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-26-2020 01:08 PM
    Thank you for this clarification Aren. Much appreciated!

    Gay

    ------------------------------
    Gay O'Hanlon
    Lead Teacher
    The Village School
    Milton MA
    ------------------------------



  • 28.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-29-2020 03:30 PM
    Hi all,
    Thank you for all this information.  I am just getting up to speed here.  Am I reading correctly that you are keeping your classrooms to 8-10 children with two teachers?  I only have two rooms, one for the three's and one for the four's.  Usually we have 16 children in the room with two teachers.  So that means we will need to cut each day down by 6 children, is that right?  Is that an official requirement (10 children) or is that a suggested number?  I am having trouble finding consistent information from the various official organizations.
    Any help is apprecated.

    ------------------------------
    Joanne Kiel
    Director
    Bryn Athyn Church Preschool
    Bryn Athyn PA
    ------------------------------



  • 29.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-29-2020 05:34 PM
    In Kansas we have not been required to go to 10 in a classroom.  We can go as high as we are licensed for, although most programs
    are staying way below that number.  I think the biggest thing would be to see how you can arrange your room to allow for physical distancing and then go from there.  Unless of course, PA has a specific requirement.

    Mary Kay

    ------------------------------
    Mary Kay Scanlon
    Program Director
    Holy Trinity Early Educaqtion Center
    Lenexa, KS
    ------------------------------



  • 30.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-30-2020 07:26 AM

    Joanne:

    It's important to know the requirements for reopening in your own state,  Your best source of information is your licensor and your current state protocols.  Getting ideas in this forum is really valuable but your state requirements may be different than someone else's.



    ------------------------------
    Aren Stone
    she/her/hers
    Child Development Specialist
    The Early Years Project
    Cambridge, MA
    ------------------------------



  • 31.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-11-2020 10:52 AM
    Hi Donna,
     I am also in a Catholic Preschool. I am the Assistant Principal over the preschool. I would like to connect with you and see how you are doing things in MA. You can message me privately. Thanks

    ------------------------------
    Sarah Harris
    Children''s Learning Center
    Plano TX
    ------------------------------



  • 32.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-18-2020 07:21 AM
    We reopened our center this week. No adults other than teachers are allowed inside of our building. We go out to the cars and temp the children and ask each day if any fever reducing medicine was given to the child in the last 24 hours. Parents then sign our check in form with their own pen.

    Once inside our entrance, children remove their shoes and go to their hallway cubbies and put clean shoes on prior to entering the classroom. Teachers have hooks by their classroom door to hang their smock, mask and classroom shoes.

    We use empty rock salt buckets filled with bleach water to clean our toys.  These buckets are placed outside. We are fortunate that each classroom has an exterior door. At clean up time the children are each given a mesh bag and they fill them with toys. The bags are then dunked in the water. The mesh bags are easy to hang from the fence. At nap time the teacher take the dried toys and put them where they belong.

    Today is our fourth day of our new process. The children seem to enjoy "filling" their bags at clean up time.

    ------------------------------
    Barb Dolan
    Our Lord's Little Ones
    Mundelein IL
    ------------------------------



  • 33.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-15-2020 06:10 PM
    Hello all,
    I've never posted before so not sure if I'm posting or only sending an e-mail to James.....
    We have been closed since mid-March but started out our summer camp program with 3 small "playgroups" - we have 3 groups of 8 children and 2 staff. They arrive at 9 and leave at noon. This week we expanded to 1 more group. Arrival is done curbside with a teacher from each group on deck to receive only their children. We have had parents sign a waiver (although waiver signed on behave of a minor offers minimal protection in FL). Staff has also signed the waiver. Parents are given a pack of screening forms which they turn in to us each morning. On this form they must initial that the child, nor any household members have experienced symptoms (listed separately); that the child has not received any fever reducing medication; no one in the household has  knowingly been in contact with anyone with symptoms or positive for COVID-19 and that no one has arrived from anywhere outside of the US in that past 14 days (I'm happy to share this form if it would be helpful to anyone). The daily temps are recorded on this form - temp is taken 2/day. Our groups are static - no changes in campers or teachers throughout the week. Our teachers  they could not work for a week of summer camp unless they can commit to all 5 days - not sure how we will do this during the school year.  We originally thought we would keep siblings together but that turned out to be difficult in terms of age differences in the groups. Given that the whole camp would have to shut down if there was a case, we decided splitting siblings was not a critical piece of the plan. Increased hand washing is of course part of the plan but I wish we had more sinks (our classrooms do not have them - everyone has to use the bathrooms which get disinfected between groups).
    We spend as much time as possible outside - disinfecting the playgrounds between groups with a disinfection dilution of bleach (1/2 cup to 1 gallon of water).
    For inside, I examined the EPA N List for "Food Contact. No Rinse"; low contact time; the "emerging pathogen claim" and a toxicity category of IV (least toxic). The one we chose was Bioesque (4 min. contact time - among the lowest).
    Our teachers wear masks all day but we have not asked the children to given that young children seem to touch their faces so much if the have a mask on.
    The individual supply bins have been difficult to manage as well so we have not yet found the best way to handle that piece of the puzzle for our children.
    We have also decided we will serve food (each group will eat in the classroom) because with so many young children, staff would have to be handling all of the lunch boxes and containers leading to potential cross contamination.

    ------------------------------
    Anne Rothe
    Director
    Key Biscayne Presbyterian School
    Key Biscayne FL
    ------------------------------



  • 34.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-15-2020 06:39 PM
    Hi Anne, 

     I would love this form if you are willing to share. 

    Thank you, Caroline

    Sent from my iPhone





  • 35.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 10:12 AM
      |   view attached
    HI Caroline,
    Here is what we are using for campers and staff. I believe we will use it when the school year begins as well. I'm sure there is a paperless way to do this but I feel better knowing that parents have to really commit to the answers when it's pencil and paper - feels so much easier to click through without thinking when something is on line - that may be a generational assumption on my part though. ;)

    --

    Anne Rothe | Director

    Key Biscayne Presbyterian School



    160 Harbor Drive | Key Biscayne, Florida 33149

    Phone: 305.361.2058 | Fax: 305.361.8131

    Email: kbpsdirector@gmail.com | www.kbpcschool.org





    Attachment(s)



  • 36.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 11:56 AM
    Thank you Anne! We are also a morning preschool and we are planning to open a small summer camp program in July. Can I ask what are you doing about sand boxes, sand tables, and water play? We have a large sand pit in the center of our playground.

    With appreciation for everyone's great advice on this thread.


    ------------------------------
    Anita Prentice
    Interim Director
    St. Philip's Nursery School
    Garrison NY
    ------------------------------



  • 37.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 01:50 PM
    I would love if you can share this form as well please Anne.... We have 3 different forms and we have challenges since the parents have subsidy for child care and have to swipe their card for us to get paid this is a challenge for us so we have set up shop outside with signs that say stay six feet apart..






  • 38.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 05:20 PM
      |   view attached
    HI Paloma,
    that does sound challenging - this might be too much for you. I wonder if they could do something on an iPad or something ? I feel badly that we are using so much paper but not sure how else to get parents to take it somewhat seriously. 
    Good Luck

    --

    Anne Rothe | Director

    Key Biscayne Presbyterian School



    160 Harbor Drive | Key Biscayne, Florida 33149

    Phone: 305.361.2058 | Fax: 305.361.8131

    Email: kbpsdirector@gmail.com | www.kbpcschool.org





    Attachment(s)



  • 39.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 04:50 AM
    Thank you so much for your ideas. I would love a copy of your form for sure. I have been asked by my coordinator to do a proposal to re-open our schools making safety the number one rule.

    Sent from my iPhone




  • 40.  RE: What does it really look like in a pandemic adjusted classroom?

    Posted 06-16-2020 10:13 AM
     He Vera
     Here is what we are using for campers and staff. I believe we will use it when the school year begins as well. I'm sure there is a paperless way to do this but I feel better knowing that parents have to really commit to the answers when it's pencil and paper - feels so much easier to click through without thinking when something is on line - that may be a generational assumption on my part though. ;)  

    --

    Anne Rothe | Director

    Key Biscayne Presbyterian School



    160 Harbor Drive | Key Biscayne, Florida 33149

    Phone: 305.361.2058 | Fax: 305.361.8131

    Email: kbpsdirector@gmail.com | www.kbpcschool.org