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Support from Biden?

  • 1.  Support from Biden?

    Posted 17 days ago
    I hv heard historical support for childcare is coming through Biden. Do you hv any information on this?

    Sent from my iPhone


  • 2.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 17 days ago
    It may be a long time coming. Your best support is to be in contact with your local Childcare Resource and referral agency. It seems that most of the initiatives will be funnelled through to the states and then the county level.

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    Marybeth Simoneit
    Director
    LECC
    Niagara Falls NY
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  • 3.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 17 days ago

    Be sure to watch his speech tonight. 

    Apparently it is part of the agenda



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    Pamela McCullough
    Director
    GSCC
    Holland PA
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  • 4.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 17 days ago

    Hi Melinda,

    President Biden announced the American Families Plan this morning, which covers Child Care extensively, and will be speaking about it live in front of Congress tonight at 9PM ET / 6PM PT.

    I happen to have the fact sheet open :) and will paste the portions that mention Child Care below

    -Eric

    TOOTRiS Child Care On Demand


    from https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/04/28/fact-sheet-the-american-families-plan/

    Provide direct support to children and families. Our nation is strongest when everyone has the opportunity to join the workforce and contribute to the economy. But many workers struggle to both hold a full-time job and care for themselves and their families. The American Families Plan will provide direct support to families to ensure that low- and middle-income families spend no more than seven percent of their income on child care, and that the child care they access is of high-quality. It will also provide direct support to workers and families by creating a national comprehensive paid family and medical leave program that will bring the American system in line with competitor nations that offer paid leave programs. The system will also allow people to manage their health and the health of their families. And, it will provide critical nutrition assistance to families who need it most and expand access to healthy meals to our nation's students – dramatically reducing childhood hunger.

     

    The hope of a middle-class life has gotten further and further out of reach for too many American families, as the costs of raising children – from child care to taking paid leave time to care for a new child or when a child is ill – have grown. Middle-class families and those trying to break into the middle class increasingly feel the strain of these rising costs, while wage growth has failed to keep up. These rising costs impact our economy as a whole as well. In part due to the lack of family friendly policies, the United States has fallen behind its competitors in female labor force participation. One study found that a lack of child care options costs the United States economy $57 billion per year in lost earnings, productivity, and revenue. Another study found that lack of paid leave options cost workers $22.5 billion each year in lost wages.

    CHILD CARE

    The high cost of child care continues to make it hard for parents – especially women - to work outside the home and provide for their families. Difficulty in finding high-quality, affordable child care leads some parents to drop out of the labor force entirely, some to reduce their work hours, and others to turn down a promotion. When a parent drops out of the workforce, reduces hours, or takes a lower-paying job early in their careers-even temporarily-there are lifetime consequences on earnings, savings, and retirement. These costs are especially significant for mothers and people of color, exacerbating inequality and harming the economic security of their families, as 91 percent of the income gains experienced by middle-class families over the last forty years were driven by women's earnings.

    High-quality early care and education lay a strong foundation so that children can take full advantage of education and training opportunities later in life. The evidence is clear: for early years, quality care is education. This especially important for children from low-income families, who too often start school without access to high-quality educational opportunities. A study by Nobel Laureate James Heckman found that every dollar invested in a  high-quality, birth to five program for the most economically disadvantaged children resulted in $7.30 in benefits as children grew up healthier, were more likely to graduate high school and college, were less likely to be involved in crime, and earned more as adults.

    Building on the American Jobs Plan's investments in school and child care infrastructure and workforce training, President Biden's American Families Plan will ensure low and middle-income families pay no more than 7 percent of their income on high-quality child care, saving the average family $14,800 per year on child care expenses, while also generating lifetime benefits for three million children, supporting hundreds of thousands of child care providers and workers, allowing roughly one million parents, primarily mothers, to enter the labor force, and significantly bolstering inclusive and equitable economic growth. Specifically, President Biden's plan will invest $225 billion to:

    • Make care affordable. Families will pay only a portion of their income based on a sliding scale. For the most hard-pressed working families, child care costs for their young children would be fully covered and families earning 1.5 times their state median income will pay no more than 7 percent of their income. The plan will also provide families with a range of options to choose from for their child, from child care centers to family child care providers, Early Head Start, and public schools that are inclusive and accessible to all children.
       
    • Invest in high-quality care. Child care providers will receive funding to cover the true cost of quality early childhood care and education–including a developmentally appropriate curriculum, small class sizes, and culturally and linguistically responsive environments that are inclusive of children with disabilities. These investments support positive interactions that promote children's social-emotional and cognitive development.
       
    • Invest in the care workforce. More investment is needed to support early childhood care providers and educators, more than nine in ten of whom are women and more than four and ten of whom are women of color. They are  among the most underpaid workers in the country and nearly half receive public income support programs. The typical child care worker earned $12.24 per hour in 2020-while receiving few, if any, benefits, leading to high turnover and lower quality of care. This investment will mean a $15 minimum wage for early childhood staff and ensure that those with similar qualifications as kindergarten teachers receive comparable compensation and benefits. And, it will ensure child care workers receive job-embedded coaching and professional development, along with additional training opportunities funded by the American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan. These investments will lead to better quality care, while also enabling these workers to care for their own families, reducing government spending on income support programs and increasing tax revenues.  The Families Plan will also invest in maternal health and support the families of veterans receiving health care services.

    Permanently increase tax credits to support families with child care needs. To help families afford child care, President Biden is calling on Congress to make permanent the temporary Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC) expansion enacted in the American Rescue Plan. Families will receive a tax credit for as much as half of their spending on qualified child care for children under age 13, up to a total of $4,000 for one child or $8,000 for two or more children. A 50 percent reimbursement will be available to families making less than $125,000 a year, while families making between $125,000 and $400,000 will receive a partial credit with benefits at least as generous as those they receive today. The credit can be used for expenses ranging from full-time care to after school care to summer care.

    This is a dramatic expansion of support to low- and middle-income families. In 2019, a family claiming a CDCTC for the previous year got less than $600 on average towards the cost of care, and many low-income families got nothing. If Congress fails extend the CDCTC expansion, more than 6 million families could see their taxes go up at the end of the year – many by thousands of dollars – making obtaining affordable child care more difficult. Importantly, this tax credit works in tandem with the American Families Plan's direct investments in childcare affordability for families with young children.



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    Eric Cutler
    CMO
    TOOTRiS
    San Diego CA
    https://tootris.com
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  • 5.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 16 days ago
    Thank you for sharing that Eric. An important piece of this is going to have to be pay increases and higher quality training for childcare workers. It is critical that the best and brightest workers look at childcare as a possible career, not just a job. With both parents working, children are spending more and more time in our centers. The caregivers have got to have the knowledge and training to be able to provide the best environment possible for these children. By providing them with a living wage, only then will the turnover slow down and children will begin to receive the best care possible.

    Laurie Jackson
    Retired Educator

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    Laurie Jackson
    Retired teacher
    Little River SC
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  • 6.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 16 days ago
    Nothing will happen if the Republicans do not join with the Democrats to support childcare investment or if all 50 Democrats do not vote as a bloc with Kamala Harris casting the 51st vote to make it a majority.

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    Nora Krieger, PhD
    Associate Professor Emerita/Past Chair NJEEPRE
    Bloomfield College/NJ Educators Exploring the Practices of Reggio Emilia
    Highland Park, NJ
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  • 7.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 15 days ago
    This all sounds wonderful.  It is time that child care and early childhood education had a voice.  The proposal doesn't seem to address the hiring crisis in the field.  Our center has been trying to hire for over a year.  We are offering $15.00 plus benefits, even a scholarship sponsorship and still receive no applicants.  If you look on the job posting site in our area, there are over 30 pages of centers and public schools looking for early childhood professionals and even entry level workers interested in pursuing the field.  Who then determines which centers receive the benefits?  Our center has received no benefits from the previous COVID related funds.  Thank you for your time.  Have a great weekend!

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    Cynthia Bohrer
    Director
    Kids International Early Childhood Education Cente
    Ellisville MO
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  • 8.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 15 days ago
    For anyone who may not have seen, NAEYC released a Statement on President Biden's Proposal for Child Care and Pre-K.  Below is our NAEYC Notes message with a link to the full statement.

     

    On Wednesday, the White House released the American Families Plan, calling for an historic investment of $425 billion for child care and prek to build equity, quality, and supply, by advancing a supported and compensated early childhood education workforce in centers, schools, Head Starts, and homes. Early childhood educators can feel hopeful about the bold investments which President Biden outlined in his Joint Address to Congress, and NAEYC looks forward to working with educators, families, Congress and the Administration to build a renewed, unified high-quality early childhood education system that recognizes and values the complex work of all educators working with children beginning at birth, so that our children, families, educators, and economy can thrive. Read our full statement.



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    Gill Walker
    National Association for the Education of Young Children
    Washington DC
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  • 9.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 14 days ago
    Cynthia,
    We have been experiencing the same problem in our area. We cannot find individuals who want to work in early childhood and there are so many businesses wanting to hire people that can pay more than what the centers in our area can pay and they cannot find employees either. Our local community college dropped their early childhood program years ago so people cannot be trained in our area unless they look in other areas of our state.

    Also, I live in a rural area with only 3 day care centers for over 17,000 people in our county. I just wonder how this funding is going to work if the current centers are at capacity with a waitlist and there are no other centers to choose from. I've had friends look into the cost and regulations for opening a day care center and they determined they wouldn't even break even, much less make a profit to live on.
    Caroline Turner

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    Caroline Turner
    Pre-K Teacher
    Avery County Schools
    Elk Park NC
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  • 10.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 14 days ago
    The crisis is more complicated than raising the hourly pay $15 an hour. The community early childhood centers cannot compete with public schools that offer programs for 3 and 4-year-olds and pay their teachers the same as all their elementary school teachers. Unless income is no issue, early childhood prepared teachers will go where they can make a living income that makes it possible for them to support their families.

    On the other hand, I am sorry to hear about so many of those writing here not able to receive any help from the earlier relief bills. We have to do better. Write to your legislators. Talk to groups that may be able to guide you through the process of obtaining funds.

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    Nora Krieger, PhD
    Associate Professor Emerita/Past Chair NJEEPRE
    Bloomfield College/NJ Educators Exploring the Practices of Reggio Emilia
    Highland Park, NJ
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  • 11.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 14 days ago
    I work in a school system and our non-salaried employees do not make as much as fast food workers in our area and our fast food restaurants are struggling as well. For example, the local McDonalds has 3 employees and they can only open the drive thru even though COVID restrictions will allow the dining to be open at partial capacity. And its not just non-salaried employees, a new fast food chain is opening a local restaurant and the manager of that store will start our making around $80,000, that is well above teacher pay in NC by about $20,000.

    We also have many individuals who tell us that they can make more money drawing unemployment benefits right now than they could at any job in our area. One child who attends our school has 2 parents drawing unemployment and they live a life far beyond what I could being a salaried teacher (vacations, new toys, new clothes almost weekly).

    I feel like this is great for early childhood to get funding because we have functioned on minimal funding for a long time now but it also seems like some of the other policies that Biden is proposing or have already been passed work against this one.

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    Caroline Turner
    Pre-K Teacher
    Avery County Schools
    Elk Park NC
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  • 12.  RE: Support from Biden?

    Posted 14 days ago
    I keep hearing the same thing regarding the unemployment benefits even with us offering $15.00 per hour.  There are school districts in our area trying to hire for their early childhood programs and are unable to find people.  It is not just the child care field, there are restaurants on our area that have to close one day a week to allow the only staff that they have to get a day off.

    We just enrolled a new family using state assistance because the father decided to stay at home with the children and enrolled the child for 5 days a week.  We receive approximately $16.00 a day for the child from subsidy.  I am not sure that there is an answer for the this.

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    Cynthia Bohrer
    Director
    Kids International Early Childhood Education Cente
    Ellisville MO
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