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Quiet Area

  • 1.  Quiet Area

    Posted 01-24-2019 04:24 PM
    I was a student last year for my education classes that i was taking while I was in college. The first center that I was at for one of my education class only had 14 children, the other center that I was at for  my teaching practicium: preschool class had anywhere between 20-30 children. That classroom was the purple room and was the 3-5 year old classroom. The quiet area was in the back of the classroom near the closet where the teachers put their belongings and toys for the classroom. I noticed that in that classroom the quiet area should have been placed in a different area away from the closet and the shelf where the toy dolls were. Does anyone have any advice on how to set up a good calm down area? and what should be in the calm down area to help the children calm down?

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    Cheryl Morris
    Saint Louis MO
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  • 2.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 01-28-2019 09:50 PM
    Placement of the quiet area is very important. Some of the ideal places would be near the dramatic play, science or free art. Areas that are typically more on the quiet side. By a door, sink and block area would not be a good choice. Some type of see through divider is a nice way to define the space, a small rug works well too if you don't have a divider. Pillows or soft furniture creates a calming environment.  I hope this is helpful.

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    Janice Zorn
    Minister of Tuition Ministries
    St Andrew's Preschool
    Newport Beach CA
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  • 3.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 02-20-2019 02:08 PM
    Thank you for your input. I will keep this in mind

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    Cheryl Morris
    Saint Louis MO
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  • 4.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 02-20-2019 03:06 PM
    Quiet area near the library area I have found is the best idea. The children are able to associate books with helping calm down and they will automatically pick up a book so that they can read quietly when they are upset. I also place it in a way that other children can not stare at them because I have found that children who seek out the quiet area when they are upset, do not like when people stare at them when they are upset.

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    Temesha (Ms. Tessie) Ragan
    Family Child Care IF Facilitator
    Perfect Start Learning
    Family Child Care Provider
    Edwards, CA
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  • 5.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 02-26-2019 01:41 PM
    A quiet area is a wonderful thing!  It should be away from the most trafficked areas and should allow the child to have privacy while still maintaining visual supervision with them.  A gauzy tulle can be used, or a translucent scarf, to give the feeling of privacy for the child.  Soft materials, colors, scents and sounds help the area to stay quiet.  It should be free from most toys, though a "lovie" or two can be beneficial.  The goal for your quiet area will really determine what it needs.  If your goal is to offer children a space to center themselves, or get away from conflict, or even just a place to cry; that will guide what needs to be there.  Small fish tanks, for example, can be soothing to many children.  Focusing on a glitter jar or labyrinth can help children to feel more quiet inside.  If your quiet area is more for silent reading and less for reflection, you won't need the same sensory and soothing materials.  I do a lot of training for teachers and I am always surprised at how many do not model the use of the quiet area as a place to sit quietly, breathe, and center when one is feeling frustrated or sad.  I use this video in training with teacher, parents, and even show it to children so that we can practice how to calm ourselves.  I hope you enjoy it!  https://youtu.be/RVA2N6tX2cg

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    Lola Cornish
    President Elect
    Sacramento Valley Chapter of CAAEYC
    Sacramento CA
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  • 6.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 02-26-2019 02:08 PM
    The quiet area in my classroom is set up right by the library. It's true as another commenter said that they begin to associate books with calming down, and use them as tools. I also like to include photo albums of each child's family, with pictures provided by the parents, or even just photos taken during the school day. The familiar faces are comforting. We have a cozy cube, which is about a 3 foot enclosed square with open sides and front. I put gauzy curtains on the sides so children can have a little more privacy. Inside, there's a big cushion and two smaller pillows. I encourage children to lie down if they aren't feeling well or seem to be getting overwhelmed. I've also made some calm down sensory bottles, using glitter, baby oil, water, and liquid watercolors. When they move the bottle, the glitter swirls and the oil bubbles, creating a mesmerizing pattern. One of my Twos spent 20 minutes just shaking and staring at the bottle! Another good bottle idea is orbeez in water. They swirl and float and it's relaxing to watch. There are tons of ideas out there on Pinterest!

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    Olivia Schaffer
    Teacher
    Bright Horizons
    Atglen PA
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  • 7.  RE: Quiet Area

    Posted 02-26-2019 05:07 PM
    Thank you everyone for all of your ideas. all of the ideas give me something to think about when I am in a preschool working

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    Cheryl Morris
    Saint Louis MO
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