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Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

  • 1.  Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-09-2017 03:30 PM
    I'm struggling with implementing an anti-bias curriculum, at least to the satisfaction of my QRIS mentor. She wants posters and multicultural food and costumes. I think those are useless at best, and more likely harmful to children's perception of other cultures. My books and dolls all represent a variety of colors and socioeconomic statuses and gender diversity, which I think is really the baseline expectation of any classroom anyway, but it isn't enough.
    When we're living in such a divisive time, and the bias my (very high SES, all white) preschool students encounter in the next few years won't be "what is sushi?" but "all lives matter"... how can we implement something meaningful? When our neighborhoods and schools are already far more segregated than anyone cares to acknowledge, it all feels so desperately inadequate.

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    Elizabeth Cohen
    Kentfield CA
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  • 2.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-06-2017 02:41 PM
    What are some of your favorite anti-bias children's books that feature a multiracial, bi-racial, or mixed race child or family? I'm having a hard time finding books for infants and toddlers.

    ------------------------------
    Alissa Mwenelupembe
    St. Vincent Center for Children and Families
    Evansville IN
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  • 3.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 01:39 AM
    Hello:
    It is hard to find quality multiracial/biracial books in general, and even harder to find infant toddler books. Most important for infant toddlers are the illustrations, diverse images, photographs of babies and families. Sometimes we make our own personal family books using family photographs to be sure all children and families are included.

    Here are some of my favorites:

    Multiracial toddler/preschool  books

    Clap Hands by Oxenbury (All Fall Down)
    Black is brown is Tan by Arnold Adoff
    Dumpling Soup by Jama Kim Rattigan
    More More More Said the Baby by Vera B Williams
    Everywhere Babies by Susan Meyers
    Baby Faces Board book series
    15 things not to do with a baby By Margaret McAllister
    Hello Good Bye Window by Norton Juster
    Marisol McDonald Doesn't Match by Monica Brown



    ------------------------------
    Debbie Leekeenan
    Early Childhood Consultant and Lecturer
    Seattle WA
    http://www.antibiasleadersece.com
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 12:04 PM
    I find this website very helpful. Hopefully, it will be for you too. Enjoy it!

    http://www.teachingforchange.org/

    ------------------------------
    Clara Herrera
    CH Vision Educational Consultant
    Lilburn GA
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 06:41 AM
    Hello,

    I spent a lot of the summer looking for this very thing! I've been gathering ideas in a Google Doc- Early Childhood Book Resources
    Please feel free to look and copy any that will be useful for you. I have one tab for Infant/Toddler, one for Preschool and another for resources. Some of the resources links are lesson plans and others are the places where I got some of the book suggestions. You are welcome to share the link and I would love to add more (I'm planning to add some of the infant/toddler books from the previous poster!)

    Hope that helps!
    Sarah

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    Sarah Erdman
    Vienna VA
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  • 6.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 07:33 AM
    I'll Add
    Be Boy Buzz by bell hooks
    Eating the Rainbow - Star Bright books

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    Margo Sipes
    Baltimore MD
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  • 7.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 09:49 AM
    As a creator of curriculum for infants and toddlers, I am always on the lookout for books to suggest! Some great ones have already been suggested!. Here are some more you may want to consider.

    Carry Me by Star Bright Books
    Global Babies (and others from this series) by The Global Fund for Children
    I Can Do It Too by Karen Baicker
    Show Me Happy by Kathryn Madeline Allen
    Hands Can by Cheryl Willis Hudson
    On Mother's Lap by Ann Herbert Scott
    Happy Baby Colors by Roger Priddy
    I Can, Can You? and I Like Berries, Do You? by Marjorie J. Pitzer

    There are many more!

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    Judith Mullican
    West Jefferson NC
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  • 8.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-07-2017 02:58 PM
    My biracial daughter loved "Black, White, Just Right"

    She also loves the Molly Lou Mellon books because Molly "looks like her," without race being specifically addressed.

    ------------------------------
    Lydia M. Bowers
    Sexual Health Educator
    NAEYC Affiliate Advisory Council
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-08-2017 07:58 AM

    So many great titles already shared, so I'll just add some ideas of other places to look:



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    Stephanie Schott
    Early Literacy Specialist
    Maine State Library
    Augusta ME
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  • 10.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 26 days ago
    This website:  http://peaceeducators.org/resources/ may have some resources that may help in your quest for books.

    ------------------------------
    Donna Satterlee
    Assistant Professor
    University of Maryland Eastern Shore
    Princess Anne MD
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  • 11.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 25 days ago
      |   view attached
    I came across this article on how to use children's literature to address diversity in the early childhood environment, on page 13 you can find many books on the topic.

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    Anahita Barbod
    San Diego CA
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    Attachment(s)

    pdf
    biases in early age .pdf   2.40MB 1 version


  • 12.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 24 days ago
    I also recommend the site for Welcoming Schools, which lists books specifically about family diversity and has many tip sheets about how to use them with young children.
    https://www.welcomingschools.org

    ------------------------------
    Aren Stone
    she/her/hers
    Child Development Specialist
    The Early Years Project
    Cambridge, MA
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 24 days ago
    Good morning
    I use to teach a PD class on multicultural in the classroom.  And the most important thing to remember is these lessons should be everyday  lesson.  Not just a specific month.  In your dramatic play corner there should be babies of color.  In your book corner you should have books like: We are all alike we are all different.  Faces, in your doll house you should have play figures of color.  In your art center you should have multicultural paint.  By having these materials it sparks conversation and wonderful lessons can be learned and diversity can be celebrated.





  • 14.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 09-11-2017 09:10 AM
    This is a new resource from Teaching for Change - a book review project! https://socialjusticebooks.org/reviews-by-theme/

    ------------------------------
    Benjamin Planton
    Infant Toddler Outcome Specialist - Partnerships for Early Learners
    NAEYC Affiliate Advisory Council
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  • 15.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 27 days ago
    "Choosing "good" picture books featuring diverse (BIPOC) characters"
    This webinar is a really good discussion with researchers Krista Aronson and Anne Sibley O'Brien who have a website based on their research into race and culture, and identity, in children's books. 
    "The collection is coded using nine categories that capture the dominant message is conveyed by books featuring BIPOC." They note that not every book is appropriate for every child-some are flagged.
    The discussion with the founders of EmbraceRace centers around why diverse books are important for all children.
    The curated collection is here:


    ------------------------------
    Peggy Ashbrook
    Early childhood science teacher
    Alexandria, VA
    NSTA The Early Years columnist, Science and Children
    Early Years blogger, www.nsta.org/earlyyears
    Author: Science Learning in the Early Years, and
    Science Is Simple
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 26 days ago
    I have a book/song that I wrote that is exactly about diversity and shows diversity...you can see/hear me sing it on my YouTube channel.

    ------------------------------
    Joanie Calem
    Music and Inclusion Specialist
    Sing Along
    Columbus, OH
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  • 17.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 26 days ago
    ​Just finished watching the Zoom Webinar with Andrew and Melissa from Embrace Race, Krista Aronson and Anne Sibley O'Brian.  Very informative.  And cannot wait to go to the Diversebookfinder.org/book website.

    ------------------------------
    Sandra Greenhoe
    Teacher Assistant
    Head Start
    Lansing MI
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  • 18.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 22 days ago
      |   view attached
    This was a great webinar, I'm glad to see that you recommended it, I was going to! I am also attaching the tool that they recommended during the webinar.

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    Kristen Wheeler Highland
    Specalist
    MnAEYC-MnSACA
    Saint Paul MN
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    Attachment(s)



  • 19.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 24 days ago
      |   view attached
    I kept a list of diversity related books that I used in my classroom. I sorted them by diversity topic, although often they fall into more than one category. I hope you find this helpful!

    ------------------------------
    Laurie Strouse
    Program Specialist
    Penn State Better Kid Care
    Port Matilda PA
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    Attachment(s)



  • 20.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 23 days ago
    There are more and more of these books coming out. Still not enough - but better than it was. Take a look at www.childpeacebooks.org. It's the data base for the Children's Peace and Anti-bias Library at Cabrillo College. Go to "Find Books". You can look up books by social identity (race, family structure, religion, ethnicity, etc.) and by the age of the child. You can also look up topics and peace education strands. For infant/toddlers, it's the pictures that matter most and there are a lot of photo books that are deliciously multiracial. It's important that there be books featuring multi-raical/bi-racial children that are not specifically about race . We do need books that show children overcoming racism - but we also need books that do not problemize (is that a word?) racialized identity. One of my current favorites in the newer books is "The Airport Book" by Lisa Brown. It's a delightful romp of a biracial family on a plane trip to visit grandparents. If you are looking for books that directly address bi-racial identity - you can't beat "Black is Brown is Tan" by Arnold Adoff for 2 to 6 year olds. For older children (4 - 7) I love Katie Kissinger's "All the Colors We Are".

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    [Julie] [Olsen Edwards]
    Soquel CA
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  • 21.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 22 days ago
    This is a really terrific resource started by a  professor at Bates College in Maine. Really Great!!!
    https://diversebookfinder.org/

    ------------------------------
    Katy Forcillo
    Young Fives Teacher
    Grosse Pointe Public Schools.
    Grosse Pointe, MI
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  • 22.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 19 days ago
    Hi Alissa. Here are some children's books as well as educator resources. I hope this information is helpful!

    Children's books:

    Educator resources:
    • Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves -L. Sparks & J. Edwards
    • A Place for Me: Including Children with Special Needs in Early Care and Education Settings - P. Chandler
    • Alike and Different: Exploring Our Humanity with Young Children (Rev. ed.) - B. Neugebauer, Ed.
    • Anti-Bias Curriculum: Tools for Empowering Young Children - L. DermanSparks & the A.B.C. Task Force
    • Celebrate! An Anti-Bias Guide to Enjoying Holidays in Early Childhood Programs- J. Bisson
    • Roots and Wings, Revised Edition - S. York
    • Creative Resources for Anti-Bias Classroom - N. Hall
    Melissa Joiner

    ------------------------------
    Melissa Joiner
    TECTA
    Memphis TN
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  • 23.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 19 days ago
    Some of my favorites anti-bias children's books are-
    Whoever You Are- by Mem Fox
    We're Different, We're the Same And We're All Wonderful- By Bobbi Jane Kates

    ------------------------------
    Mona Bhatia
    Director/Owner
    Kiddie Academy of Wexford & Cranberry
    Cranberry Twp PA
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 12:42 AM
    Contact Monique Marshall. I got to know her as she is speaking at our early childhood conference. This is her expertise.
    mmarshall@wildwood.org

    ------------------------------
    Scott Mesh, CEO
    Los Niños Training, NYC
    www.youngchildexpo.com
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 07:39 AM
    I think there is a general lack of understanding about what it means to be culturally inclusive and respectful. I am a consultant and I often go into classrooms that have multicultural items but nothing reflecting the actual cultures of their students' families. While I believe that it is our teaching of kindness that makes children accepting, it is true that environmental ratings systems require the posters and dolls. I don't think we know if having those items in a classroom teaches what we intend, they aren't doing harm. The important thing is that we realize that the items aren't teaching. We are.

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    Cindy Terebush, Author of "Teach the Whole Preschooler: Strategies for Nurturing Developing Minds"
    Old Bridge NJ
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  • 26.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 08:38 AM
    I think it's how you use those materials that matters.  If they are just there in the classroom, then I think you're right. But if they are integrated into a true anti-bias curriculum (which is much, much more than the artifacts you describe), they can be powerful tools when used appropriately.

    ------------------------------
    Cathy McAuliffe, PhD
    Early Childhood Coordinator
    NorthWest Arkansas Community College
    Bentonville, Arkansas
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  • 27.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 12:08 PM
    Cathy,
    I don't disagree with you at all, but I am curious if you wouldn't mind giving an example of how you've seen these items intentionally used in line with Anti-Bias Curriculum, particularly goals three and four. Perhaps I'm really missing something key in the implementation.

    I worry about stereotyping with materials. I also worry about furthering the perceived divide between the children in my group and people who are "different" somehow. At a developmental stage where they're so interested in classifying as a method of making sense of their world, I worry that posters and dress-up clothes really just serve to further that "othering" and enforce that culture is a) one-dimensional and b) a costume to wear when you feel like it.

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    Elizabeth Cohen
    Kentfield CA
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  • 28.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 05:23 PM
    I think those materials might actually tie more into Goal 2 -- seeing all the diversity of humankind.  But I can see your dilemma -- it sounds like you don't  have a lot of diversity within your classroom (or program, even).  My personal examples all  come from working with groups of preschoolers who were very diverse.  I agree with the other person who commented that just having those materials is a tourist approach and does  more harm than good.  I, too, have seen that in way too  many EC classrooms.  (I have a problem with the whole issue of so many classrooms looking a like a photo from one of the prominent catalogs, and that's what so many programs do, don't you think?  Just order the posters, the plastic food, etc.) So I love that you are asking the question.

    ------------------------------
    Cathy McAuliffe, PhD
    Early Childhood Coordinator
    NorthWest Arkansas Community College
    Bentonville, Arkansas
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  • 29.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-11-2017 11:52 AM
    I appreciate this discussion so much and wanted to offer one additional thought. I have worked with many programs pursuing NAEYC Accreditation, and I think all of the standards that relate to cultural awareness and responsiveness have been confusing to teachers, administrators, etc. When they look at meeting those standards, there is deep misunderstanding, and if programs do not have someone guiding them through this process, the "tourist approach" as some have called it  comes into play.
    I think this is especially true in classrooms where there is little to no "ethnic" diversity, and teachers overlook all of the other ways in which children are the same/different.

    ------------------------------
    Nancy Hafner
    Community Engagement Specialist
    Willmar Public Schools
    Willmar MN
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  • 30.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-11-2017 02:01 PM
    Unbiased Curriculum
    It's unfortunate that we even have to have these discussions but the reality is we are in a biased society. That said, we have to understand, and take into consideration - children's biases are learned from the very people they look up to at a very early age. How do we unlearn biases and effectively teach cultural inclusion?
    How do we teach a new or inclusive approach, without being stereo typical, if we ourselves are biased?
    Society does not allow us the unlearn biases it's in the media and advertising messages every day. Teaching love, respect, and acceptance towards individuals - and their diversity- will go much further than props to set the stage for cultural inclusion. Secondly, Parent involvement.
    A friend of mine told me of a story - he went to a work colleague's house to purchase a trailer he had for sale. He knocked on the door a little girl, two years old, came to the door and hollered, daddy, there's a "N" at the door! By "N" I don't mean Nincompoop, Neanderthal or Noodle head. The father was obviously embarrassed and attempted to apologize while scolding the child who look confused. My friend went on to admonish the dad for scolding her for what he has taught her.
    There's an old axiom that "people do not change". Well, according the Black Doll White doll study children's biases don't change much either. Which leads me to my next question, are biases learned or inherent?
    Oftentimes we have to look inside ourselves first to understand our own biases and stereotypes in order to teach others, especially our youngest learners.
    ECE is the frontline, the last bastion of defense in public academia prior to children entering community schools for their primary educational experiences. If we get it wrong in the beginning they will have a hard time coping in the end.
    It's a New Age and no longer takes a village to raise a child. Today, it's a global effort. We're in an Era of Smart Phones, Smart Cars and Smart Homes. It's high time we focus on making all of our children smart at a deeper level. They may surprise us on how much they learn.

    ------------------------------
    Gary Beulah
    CEO
    SoftBlue
    Riverdale GA
    ------------------------------



  • 31.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 09:13 AM
    I agree with you and appreciate that you're trying to do something more authentic than food and costumes.  Focusing on food and costumes is 'tourist curriculum'.  Do people in countries that aren't the same as yours wear those clothes in their daily lives?  Probably not.  It might be another form of stereotyping.  It still makes people who aren't white and living in the U.S. into 'others'.  Incorporating games, toys, foods, songs, music for dancing, etc. from all over the world and from many different cultures in the U.S. into the daily life of the classroom might feel more inclusive.

    I think that real anti-bias teaching starts with teachers looking at our own biases and how they come into our language and how we see children.  Do we have subtle (or not so subtle) differences in our vision of, expectations and treatment of boys and girls?  Of children of a race or culture different than our own?  Thank you for pointing out that anti-bias curriculum is more than food and costumes.  Good luck educating your mentor.

    ------------------------------
    Aren Stone
    Child Development Specialist
    The Early Years Project
    Cambridge, MA
    ------------------------------



  • 32.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-10-2017 06:59 PM
    I wanted to share some resources with you from the NAEYC website about Anti-Bias Education.  This article from Young Children, Moving Beyond Anti-Bias Activities: Supporting the Development of Anti-Bias Practices, includes a number of classroom examples you might find useful.

    ------------------------------
    Susan Friedman

    ------------------------------



  • 33.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 12-11-2017 05:47 AM
    Hello everyone.
    This is an interesting discussion. I think it is extremely difficult to "do" an anti-bias curriculum if you are not working on yourself at the same time. The way we acquired bias and prejudice started in our earliest childhood. Our unconscious behaviors and earliest emotional memory in our brains affects our intentionality. This type of self reflection is hard work! I wrote a book about this, and I believe it is at the core of why implementing an anti-bias curriculum is so challenging. My book is Confronting Our Discomfort: Clearing the Way to Anti-Bias in Early Childhood. (Heinemann 2003)

    Best wishes to all - keep up the good work. But, remember, good intentions are not enough!

    ------------------------------
    Tamar Jacobson, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Rider University
    Lawrenceville, New Jersey
    ------------------------------



  • 34.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 01-07-2018 05:27 PM
    n/a




  • 35.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 11-06-2018 11:37 AM
    Thanks for starting this thread.  I remember years ago (2006?) reading an article in The Young Child that talked about the problem of "multicultural" dress up clothing.  The article made a lot of sense to me but I actually can't remember what the solutions that were suggested in this article were.  Today I was confronted by some "Mexican" dress up clothing ordered from a catalog.  Interestingly last year a Mexican American family in my classroom brought in some clothing that some members of their family wear during Dia de Virgin de Guadalupe festivities, that didn't look super different from the dress up cloths from the catalog.  This was interesting because part of our anti-bias policy is to not celebrate or really recognize and religious holidays.  I think it would be great for us all to hear more about the ways that classrooms are successfully doing Anti-bias, especially given that the industry is so quick to market a over simplified (and many times problematic) solution to any new requirement or standard.  Again, it is great reading different people's takes on this challenge.

    ------------------------------
    Jonathan Dudley
    Gardner MA
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  • 36.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 11-10-2018 11:35 AM
    As a teacher and director, I have been thinking about this for a long time. To help parents and teachers, I started a blog where I post anti-bias activities and those that plant the seeds of social justice. It's not commercial - I'm not selling anything, just putting ideas out there. You might find some of the activities helpful: www.parentingforchange.com.

    ------------------------------
    Debra Jacobs
    Director
    Children of the World Preschool
    Somerville MA
    ------------------------------



  • 37.  RE: Anti-Bias and Teaching Equity in Ways that Matter

    Posted 9 days ago
    Hi! Sorry for the late reply. I'm a children's librarian at a public library in CO. Others are right; it used to be very hard to find these books but over the past 5 years there have been LOTS of new books published showing multicultural families :) Here are some of my faves: (most are picture books) Please feel free to reach out to my email below if you have any other book-related questions in which I may be able to help!

    A Boy Like You by Frank Murphy
    Happy In Our Skin by Fran Manushkin
    All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold
    One Family by George Shannon
    The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson
    I Love My Hair! by Natasha Anastasia Tarplay
    Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You by Sonia Sotomayor
    Sunny Day: A Celebration of the Sesame Street Theme Song by Joe Raposo
    You Matter by Christian Robinson
    Love by Matt De La Pena
    Festival of Colors by Kabir Sehgal & Surishtha Sehgal
    Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard
    The Proudest Blue: A Story of Hijab and Family by Ibtihaj Muhammad
    Dreamers by Yuyi Morales
    ABC What Can She Be? and ABC What Can He Be? both by Sugar Snap Studio
    Little People, Big Dreams series - picture book biographies
    Thing Big, Little One, Little Legends: Exceptional Men in Black History, and Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History - all by Vashti Harrison
    Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry

    ------------------------------
    Leigh Ramey
    Youth Services Librarian
    lramey@cityofwestminster.us
    Westminster Public Library
    Westminster CO
    ------------------------------