Open Discussion Forum

Expand all | Collapse all

Anti bias curriculum

  • 1.  Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 29 days ago
    Does anyone have an anti bias curriculum they can share, including book list and other resources? Thanks in advance

    Sent from my iPhone


  • 2.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 28 days ago

    Hello Resna,

    This looks like a good resource: 'Anti-Bias Education for Young Children & Ourselves' https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/books/anti-bias-education


    Best wishes 



    ------------------------------
    Patricia Mezu
    Professional Minds FZ LLC
    www.prminds.org
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 28 days ago
    Thanks Patricia, I have that one. I was looking for more of a curriculum ideas for the class.

    Sent from my iPhone




  • 4.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 28 days ago
    Hi Resna,

    Here are some resources.

    Starting Small:
    https://www.tolerance.org/classroom-resources/film-kits/starting-small

    Making Thinking Visible:
    http://www.pz.harvard.edu/resources/making-thinking-visible-how-to-promote-engagement-understanding-and-independence

    Multicultural Principles:
    https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/culture-language/article/multicultural-principles-early-childhood-leaders

    Roots and Wings:
    https://www.redleafpress.org/Roots-and-Wings-Third-Edition-Affirming-Culture-and-Preventing-Bias-in-Early-Childhood-P1427.aspx

    Cultural Diversity and Responsiveness:
    https://extension.psu.edu/programs/betterkidcare/lessons/cultural-diversity

    Hope this helps :)

    ------------------------------
    Alaleh Amini
    YoungStar Consultant
    Child Care Partnership
    River Falls WI
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 28 days ago
    Thank you so much Alaleh

    Sent from my iPhone





  • 6.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 27 days ago
    These look great! I'll be researching the links as well:))

    Especially the resources. It's important for the physical environment to represent the curriculum. I'm sure we agree that it (the environment) is also part of the way in which the curriculum is implemented.

    Best wishes

    Thanks!

    Patricia Mezu
    Professional Minds MEA
    +971 50 921 8035 | About Me
     


    ________________________________________________________________________


    This communication (including any attachments) is intended for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) only and may contain information that is confidential, privileged, or legally protected. Any unauthorised use or dissemination of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, kindly notify the sender immediately, by return e-mail and delete all copies of the original communication. 

    Thank you for your cooperation.

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________







  • 7.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 26 days ago
    Hi Resna,

    Following on Patricia's mention of the environment, here's a great webinar on using loose parts to support culturally sustainable environments. This was very helpful to me in thinking about how my physical set up is supporting Anti-Bias Education. Also, here's an audit tool for creating ECE environments that support gender justice.

    Some more the ways that I've implemented ABE or seen it implemented in my school include:

    -Conversations: highlighting similarities and differences in everyday conversation with children and normalizing that differences are great. "Oh, Zeev takes baths at home, and River takes showers. You both get clean in different ways. Neat!"  The book "Same Same But Different" has been a big hit at my school this year and the kids will often use the title refrain in conversation! (Goal 2)

    -Creative projects that prompt children to explore their skin color, hair, eyes, etc-- including various kinds of self-portraits, mixing paint to make skin color matches, outlining bodies, etc. (Goal 1)

    -Inviting home culture/family culture into the classroom: for example, last year I worked with families to learn a (very) short song in each of their home languages, and then we would sing it most days and each child could decide which language they wanted me to sing it in. They get to hide when it is their turn so it's a game-song. (Goal 1 & 2)

    -Persona dolls: I've used persona dolls in addition to puppets to explore a wide range of issues including biases based on social identities without putting any individual children on the spot. Children develop an empathetic relationship with the doll and offer advice, helping to solve the problems. (Goal 2, 3 & 4)

    -Books: We overhauled our school library, replacing books that contain harmful stereotypes and seeking diversity and balance across the collection in who is represented and humanized as main characters. I also pause frequently to notice stereotypes in books and in general. (Goal 1, 2, 3)

    -Storytelling: Even with deliberate attempts to diversity the library, there are not enough quality books written about very family structures, characters of different races and ethnicities, class backgrounds, etc., in order to have a truly diverse and balanced collection. Storytelling is a great tool because I am in total control of all the elements of the story, and can present Goldilocks with two papa bears, for example. (Goals 1 & 2, sometimes 3 & 4 depending on the story)

    -Intervening: always intervening in moments of teasing, exclusion, and stereotypical statements-- starting with inquiry stance and asking questions. The chapter on Clarifying Conversations & Brave Conversations in the new ABE edition have been very helpful. (Goals 3 & 4)

    -Games and discussions about what is fair vs unfair, and what can be done about it. My students love the "Stereotype or Fact?" game that is described in the ABE book. (Goals 3 & 4)

    -Modeling, sharing stories from my life, asking for advice (Goals 1-4)

    -Circle time activities that allow children to share things about them including their social identities, family structures, etc. One project I like to do at the beginning of the year is singing a modification of an old sesame st song that is also a book: "We all sing with our own voice, and we sing in harmony!" and re-writing the song with lists of what's true about the people in our circle and school community (the song/book includes hair color, eye color, family structure, form of shelter, bedtime rituals, emotions, and likes; I added skin color, what you like to wear, identities, languages, and other schools or communities you're a part of). Last year we ended up making our own version of the book as well as singing the song. (Goals 1 &2)

    What I'd like to do more of but haven't been able to do a lot of yet is help facilitate more child-led community action projects, where we notice something unfair and set about addressing it collectively. (Goal 4)


    Best,
    Encian



    ------------------------------
    Encian Pastel
    Teacher, Collective Member, Core member
    Children's Community Center, Gender Justice in Early Childhood, Bay Area Childcare Collective
    Richmond CA
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 26 days ago
    Thanks You so much for all the information you provided. I will now be able to put them all together to create a curriculum.

    Sent from my iPhone




  • 9.  RE: Anti bias curriculum

    Posted 25 days ago
    This is all really interesting. I'm now planning to write a blog post on the topic👍👍👍

    thanks!

    ------------------------------
    Patricia Mezu
    Professional Minds MEA
    www.prminds.org
    ------------------------------