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Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

  • 1.  Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

    Posted 01-12-2019 08:38 PM
    I'm hoping that some of you have experienced similar circumstances of striving to be an inclusive preschool for all children and the challenges of some parents not supporting this. Our teachers and additional therapeutic support staff are assisting a new child exhibiting challenging behaviors in the preschool classroom. We have communicated with all families of inclusion support observations/services that are ongoing in the preschool. We never breach confidentiality but some parents are very focal that this child should not be enrolled in the preschool. There have been some incidences that the children are bumped or pushed. We report all incidences to the individual parents. There have been several complaints filed against our center by the parents. Investigations report with no findings. Our center is dedicated to providing care and education to all children and we are struggling because others don't understand our choice.  Your insight and strategies are appreciated.

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    Kathie

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  • 2.  RE: Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

    Posted 01-13-2019 01:50 PM
    Last year in the spring I found myself in a 4 year old classroom, and in the fall I was in a 3-5 year old classroom. In the 4 year old classroom there was this boy who would always get into trouble some how or another. I was a student teacher in both classrooms. I noticed that with this boy in the 4 year old classroom, when he wouldn't get his way he would have fits. he wouldn't say that he was sorry if he hit one of the other children in the classroom or not. Being around children who have behavioral issues was very new to me. Now the boy that was in the 3-5 year old classroom was a different story. This boy would always find some way to get into trouble. he would even try to bite the teachers. He would throw toys at not only me but the other teachers as well. My advice to you is if parents have concerns about the needs of their child in the classroom, the teacher and the parent should sit down to discuss the parents concerns about their child, and how the teacher can help the child in the classroom.

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    Cheryl Morris
    Saint Louis MO
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  • 3.  RE: Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

    Posted 01-14-2019 08:58 AM

    Ms Boling, 

    This to me sounds like the district needs to be providing and paying for an adult one on one assistant for this child. I would document, take notes of all incidents of perceived aggressive behavior (do not put any subjective descriptions simply say: 9 a.m. Jane Doe took hand and hit John Doe on arm, 10 a.m. Jane Doe with both hands pushed John Doe and John Doe fell to ground, it would also be good to have a narrative, but only say what happened, nothing extra,) and call an IFSP/IEP and request additional support from the district or what we called in California the regional center. 

    This is not just for the benefit of the other students, but the student. The student needs to learn appropriate social interaction skills in order to fully benefit from being in a classroom with his/her peers, if students are afraid of the student owing to perceived by other students as aggressive behaviors, the student is losing out on valuable socializing opportunities. The student needs support as soon as possible. 

    Lark



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    Lark Sontag
    MA, Early Childhood Education
    Alumna Pacific Oaks College
    Trainer, Adjunct Early Childhood Education Faculty, and Early Childhood Education contributor to 30seconds
    New York Metro
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  • 4.  RE: Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

    Posted 01-14-2019 10:53 AM
    ​Inclusion is important and beneficial for all parties involved.  It is also important to have support!  We currently have a child who is enrolled with special needs, he does have an aide for a few hours a week.  In the beginning of the school year we did have some parents concerned about this child's behavior and how it impacted their child.  I explained that my goal was to have all children be as successful as they could be in our program and that we were working on developing appropriate skills for all of the children, but that not all children developed at the same rate or had the same skill set.
    Due to confidentially I never discussed the issues that our special needs child had, however  this child' parents were very vocal about their child's needs and how happy they were that they found a program that accepted their child as he was.  They actually would explain to other parents about their child and the challenges they had finding a program that was inclusive etc.  There openness really helped other parents to become empathic and a bit more patient.
    It has been so wonderful to see some of the same parents who complained about this child earlier on in the school year now greet him enthusiastically at drop off and to see how this child has benefited from being in our program.
    It is not always easy, but it is possible and so worth it.

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    Sharon Caesare
    Program Director
    St. Eugene Cathedral Preschool
    Santa Rosa CA
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  • 5.  RE: Supporting Parent Concerns when a child w/ special needs/behavioral concerns is enrolled

    Posted 02-09-2019 08:14 PM
    Great Evening,

    Hope this finds you well. I have had experience with a similar situation. It is unfortunate that they are reporting the school. Referencing back your handbook that they they received, as well as your mission statement may help. However like you stated there is confidentiality, so communicating to the parents and making them aware with communication on a regular basis shows you are keeping them aware. Sometimes it's hard for others to put themselves in another person shoes. It is not the child's fault which is why the school is trying to point the child and family in the right direction to correct or handle the concerns. Continue to put the children first and keep the parents informed.

    Have a nice Evening

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    C. Ray
    Teacher
    Michigan
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