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advice to parents about reading

  • 1.  advice to parents about reading

    Posted 13 days ago
    What are the top 3 or 4 pieces of advice you would share with a parent/grandparent about reading with their preschool-aged children? Obviously, reading would be one.  I'm looking for ideas and ways to encourage interaction... like pointing out and discussing things in the art or asking questions.

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    Donna German
    Editor
    Arbordale Publishing, LLC
    Mt Pleasant SC
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  • 2.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 13 days ago
    I was a student teacher during my last year of college and as a student teacher I was thinking of ways on how i could engage the children in reading. One piece of advice that I could give you is that young children love books that they have heard or seen before  like Cat in the hat. Also when reading a book to a child be interactive with the children, discuss what is happening in the book with the children, point to certain things on the pages to get the children's attention. Make funny animal sounds if you are reading the children a book about animals. You could also let the children hold the book and turn the pages.

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    Cheryl Morris
    Saint Louis MO
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  • 3.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    I would be sure to emphasize that this doesn't need to be an elaborate ordeal where they sit down and read a book every day (which they should).  However, when they are out and about having the child read environmental print is a big key to their success as becoming good readers down the road.  They should be able to recognize different signs and know what they are (Home Depot, Target, Kohls, places that they go).

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    Katrina Jacobs
    Lead Teacher
    New Horizon Academy
    Farmington MN
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  • 4.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    Great question! One of the best ways to entice children to books is to ensure that they see themselves reflected in what they read. So, encourage families to select books that reflect their family's experiences, culture, hobbies, etc. (This is great advice for our classroom libraries as well.) This supports the other great recommendations to make read-alouds opportunities for interactive conversations, since children and adults will be better enabled to connect to what they are reading.

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    Sherry Sanden
    Illinois State University
    Normal IL
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  • 5.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    Thanks to everyone who responded. After attending the NAEYC conference, I decided that we need to publish some of our books in boardbook format. Instead of having all the science information in our back section, I want to give parents some ideas on ways to pull the science and math from the book that would be age appropriate. I think I'll get specific about having children point to specific things in illustrations and follow each "thing" on various pages. I think I'll also provide questions that parents can ask the young children about things happening in the text and art. Some illustrators hide things for kids to find in the art and I can make sure to mention that in case kids miss them. This is a new target age group for us so I want to make sure I get it right and I appreciate everyone's input. Donna

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    Donna German
    Editor
    Arbordale Publishing, LLC
    Mt Pleasant SC
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  • 6.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    I would suggest that parents talk about the pictures because children use the pictures for context and this will help them later when they begin reading on their own.  Also, ask the child for predictions of what will happen next while reading the story. After reading the story, see if the child can recall the story, working on comprehension will help them become better readers. These are just a few of the many things parents and caregivers can do to help their children become future readers.

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    Susan Ricci
    Director/Lead Teacher
    Vale UMC Preschool
    Oakton VA
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  • 7.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    We like to talk about visual literacy(how to respond to illustrations and move beyond just labeling items in pictures). We talk about asking questions like "what's happening?" which will promote a narrative and description- while questions like "what do you see?" can be limiting (and the child will only label items).  (Reading Picture books with children by Megan Dowd Lambert is good!)

    We also talk about repeating children's questions - saying "that's a good question!" and then wondering with children - "I wonder why..." rather than jumping to answers or solutions. We talk about respecting questions as a pathway to thinking - not as a way to look for "correct" answers and supporting inquiry as a partnership rather than the child asking questions and the adult giving answers.

    Also, writing to read is important - so showing parents how we take dictation from children and transcribe their ideas and stories is important.

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    Carol Murray
    Bard Nursery School
    Red Hook NY
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  • 8.  RE: advice to parents about reading

    Posted 12 days ago
    I love this question!  I have been teaching PreK for over 20 years.  I tell parents all the time that reading to their children is the most important "educational/academic" thing that they need to do at this time.  For 3's and 4's, books with big pictures and short on words are the best!  As you read, have the children look at the pictures and pick out the characters that you are reading about.  Talk about the setting and have them predict what might come next.  I love Jan Brett, Leo Lionni, Eric Carle, Mo Willems and most all Caldecott Medal books.  I like books with no words too.  One of my favorites is Tuesday by David Wiesner.  Having a child sit on your lab and tell you the story they are seeing is precious.  Reading books that rhyme not only are fun, but teaches them how language works.

    After enjoying a book and reading it two or three times, act it out!  The Mitten, by Jan Brett is a fun one to reenact.  Being able to comprehend and retell a story is preparing them to be successful readers in the higher grades.


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    Ann Giles
    St. Luke''''''''''''''''s Episcopal Day School
    Baton Rouge LA
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