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The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

  • 1.  The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-12-2018 08:09 PM
    Hello all!

    Today the New York Times published an incredibly detailed expose on early childhood compensation that included a very complete history of the development of early education.It is a story to which you are likely to relate. This story is a must read, and it provides a backdrop to Power To The Profession, a collaboration of ECE organizations intended to define the early childhood profession by establishing a unifying framework for career pathways, knowledge, and competencies, qualifications, standards, and compensation that NAEYC is leading.

    The article is perfectly timed to lead into the webinar to be presented on January 24th by Marica Cox Mitchell, Deputy Executive Director for NAEYC, Power to the Profession, Clarity and Accountability as Necessities for ECE Compensation.

    The weekend is the perfect time to read this heartbreaking account on the Times website. It is sure to spark conversations with all stakeholders and strike a chord with you personally.

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
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  • 2.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 02:27 PM
    Fran,
    Thanks for posting this article as well as provide information about the Power to the Profession initiative where a National Task Force of 15 co-equal national early childhood membership organizations' representatives are meeting, studying research, collecting input from the Early Childhood Field, and reaching consensus on creating an Early Childhood Profession. Exciting work!

    In retirement, I'm serving as an Iowa Facilitator, seeking input from Iowa Early Childhood Workforce providers on various Decision Cycles. Iowa Association for the Education of Young Children is one of five Deep Dive states that is holding focus groups and interviewing those in the EC field to provide input to the National Task Force of Power to the Profession.

    I look forward to the webinar on Jan. 24th where Marica Cox Mitchell will speak on Clarity and Accountability as Necessities for ECE Compensation.


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    Mary Airy
    Power to the Profession Facilitator
    Iowa AEYC
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    319-560-3761
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  • 3.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 03:02 PM
    Thanks for the background, @Mary E Airy! I was unaware of the details of how the collaboration on Power to the Profession works. It's great to know more and see that you are involved. It's exciting to see so many organizations working together to build the parameters for professionalization. We need the best thinkers working together.

    This article raises the profile of the issues to the country, and hopefully will garner the attention of policymakers. A multiple page NYT Sunday paper piece and the internet blast last week are sure to get the attention of other media outlets and lawmakers. Too bad it was published on a holiday weekend, but it's probably the most well-written attention-getting article I have seen. Onward! It's a journey.

    Here's the link to the article again: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/09/magazine/why-are-our-most-important-teachers-paid-the-least.html?rref=collection/sectioncollection/magazine&action=click&contentCollection=magazine&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=&stream=top-stories&_r=1

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
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  • 4.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 02:32 PM
    Fran
    I read that article and will be using that article in my college classes. But as I meet the students in my classes who are currently Prek teachers working for $8 an hour, those are all too common stories. So glad you point our field to Power to the Profession. The time is long overdue for the importance of the ECE field to be recognized. Look forward to Marica's webinar.

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    Lynn Hartle
    Professor of Education
    The Penn State University, Brandywine
    Media PA
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  • 5.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 03:09 PM
    I'm so happy you are sharing it with your students.I hope they don't flee after reading it. Certainly, most will want to head for those PK-12 positions. Child Care is hurting. I consider myself one of the few, the proud, the child care marines who earned an advanced degree and chose child care after working for a short time in public schools, taking a massive pay and benefits cut to do what I believed. My heart is in child care, but if the wage gap was then what it is now, I may not have been strong enough to make that choice. Let's hope we make enough progress that your students will choose to work where they are needed and still earn what they are due.

    As I read the article, I hoped professors like you would share the article in their classrooms. Thanks for the work you do to empower another generation.

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
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  • 6.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 07:22 PM
    Thank you for posting the article. I feel compelled to report that in my home state of Mississippi most teachers in private child care make $7.25 an hour since the state is one of 6 that uses the Federal figure only. Also, according to NIEER's report on Head Start, MS pays their teachers the lowest wage in the country. I don't pretend to know the answer, but I have to believe that our consistent rating of being substandard in many social indicators is indicative of how we have not invested in our children.

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    Cathy Grace
    UM
    Tupelo MS
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  • 7.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-14-2018 08:32 PM
    Hi @Cathy Grace, It's a sad state of affairs (get my pun? State? LOL!)  The situation is dire and we must use this as fuel to do whatever we can to galvanize. ​

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 01:13 PM
    Perhaps the reason preschool teachers have not been compensated equally to their colleagues is because the majority of these programs are also associated with child care programs and do not require the same amount of education as a teacher in a public or private school setting.

    However, the research is evident from programs such as HighScope Perry, Abecedarian Project and Head Start have proven the urgent need for "High-quality" preschool teachers in every classroom. Teachers are critical in providing the foundational skills required for the early childhood learner to succeed. Teachers need to be educated and trained on providing the pre-emergent literacy, mathematical, and social-emotional skills necessary to be successful. The diversity of teachers is essential since they are familiar with the communities, but they need to be educated and trained in early childhood programs  just like their counterparts that serve K-12, and they need to be compensated equally.

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    Dr. Jamie Nolan

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  • 9.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 02:05 PM

    Hi Jamie:

    Hmmmm. From your comment, I believe I understand you think child care teachers should earn less money than "preschool" teachers. I think it's important to tease out how you view the difference between "preschool", child care, and head start. Do you mean Pre-K, which is funded through monies through the department of education and allocated by states to deliver programs in public schools, child care programs, and often blended with Head Start funded slots? How do you define preschool?

    As stated in the NYT article, Head Start teachers (and child care teachers) are paid less than Pre-K teachers in public school settings.Remember, Pre-K can be delivered in child care programs (as in Georgia, for example) where they are paid at the same rate as the child care educators. T

    Yes, unfortunately, the educational requirements.for child care teachers vary from state to state, and more often than not, degrees are not required for child care teachers. Are child care teachers paid less because their work is not important, complex, or as difficult as the work of a "preschool" teacher? Are the children in child care or Head Start classrooms not as deserving of the same level of interaction with a well-educated teacher? I think it is important to note that we are talking about all programs for children from birth to age five, not preschool, vs. child care, vs. head start. Our field is early care and education, and all early  childhood educators should be paid as well as K-12 teachers, if not more. Consider this from Marcy Whitebook, who is quoted in both the New York Times Article and the EWA article I posted this morning:


    "The misconception out there is that somehow the work is easy, that it doesn't take much to deal with children...And it is true that many people do the work and aren't required to have much training, but the work is incredibly demanding and complex, and according to the National Academy of Sciences, caring for and educating children age birth to 5 is every bit as demanding as caring for and educating [elementary age] children." - Marcy Whitebook

    We need to think about what ALL children from birth through age eight need and deserve, regardless of the stratifications the care and education system in the US imposes on them: Well-educated, prepared, and paid teachers.  Let's not split hairs about who should earn what in our own profession. All teachers must arrive with the same level of skill and deserve a level playing field.


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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
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  • 10.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 02:31 PM

    It was not my intention to suggest that ANY group of educators is less entitled to be compensated for the very important work that they are doing each and everyday. I was merely suggesting that the "reason" that they may not have been viewed as an equal counterpart was due to the affiliation of "day care" center, or associating it with babysitting services. Shame on those early care agencies that do not compensate those teachers fairly.

    I do believe that ALL children, especially those considered to be "at-risk" as identified by Title 1 funding  should be educated by highly qualified teachers to identify any interventions that might be required and diminish the risk of achievement gaps that exist. New York City DOE has done an outstanding job in providing free Pre-K for all 4 years olds in NYC and most recently began to offer Preschool to 3 year olds. These programs are served in the public schools as well as CBO's and have certified teachers who receive ongoing Professional Development.

     

     

    Sent from Mail for Windows 10

     






  • 11.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 01:23 PM
    Thank you for sharing this article, Fran. It really speaks to the EC Workforce efforts going on around the country. We are looking at this in Minnesota  https://ecworkforcemn.org/

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    Nancy Hafner
    Community Engagement Specialist
    Willmar Public Schools
    Willmar MN
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  • 12.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 02:09 PM
    Hi @Nancy Hafner,

    Thanks for sharing the leadership role you all in Minnesota take! We have faced a workforce crisis for too long. It takes the collective expertise and energy of people like you and yours to move the needle. Kudos!​

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 07:56 PM
    ​Thank you for sharing this great article on the undercompensated day care employees. I am a 3 year old lead teacher with a bachelors of science and just obtained my cda credential. The CDA credential is a wonderful education avenue but also can be costly if the student does not get scholarship money. Even the fee for application is 425.00 now.  When I sat in my class of 13 I looked around and heard how little everyone was getting paid and it really dawned on me how will all the many other low paid employees find the sources to obtain their CDA? I teach in New York on Long Island, my school is currently having an issue finding and keeping pre-k teachers because it requires them to have a masters degree and  work for so little money. In our case maybe the district who is supplying the UPK through our school should kick in a salary that is higher to keep these prek teachers. The state expects them to have a masters degree but like the article says there is disinterest in teaching pre-k due to the compensation. I also believe that if there is relief  for student loans if a new teacher decides to teach in urban areas where the need is greater, perhaps their can be some state compensation for student loans if students desire to go into birth to 2. Just this weekend I researched schools that offer a birth to 2 teaching certificate and found that most universities are encouraging students to get dual certification in birth to 2 and 1-6. I don't think that is fair. For teachers like me who know they want to stay teaching in under five years old there should be a degree that is deeply enriching in guiding children from birth to 5 years old. Make this degree affordable. I know this is similar to the CDA but for someone like me who wants to stay with this age I need a degree that is just birth to five years old and one that is concentrated and worth every penny and also one that owners of day cares will be willing to pay for! Day cares should be compensating their employees with more pay for further educating themselves. The corporate owned day cares are taking too much money for themselves! With my bachelors, 20 years exp., and a CDA I am at the top of my price range! My daughter makes more money than me insuring boats and odd items!

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    Tracy Anglim Klein
    Lead teacher
    Kiddie Junction preschool
    Levittown NY
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  • 14.  RE: The New York Times on teacher compensation- A must read!

    Posted 01-15-2018 08:32 PM
    Hi Tracy L Anglim Klein ,
    ​Thanks for posting on this issue. I hear and share your frustration. It is a no-win situation for someone like you who wants to make a difference for the youngest children. I always wanted to work in early education myself, and like you, I chose to not work with elementary school age children. I know how you feel.

    The problem of low compensation is not as simple as you think. For the most part, the owners and non-profit organizations that operate child care centers are not getting rich. Operating high-quality child care is extremely expensive, and middle class parents who pay tuition are paying as much as they can afford. Subsidies are not enough to help low-income families.The problem is a super complex because the funding required to operate first class early childhood programs, provide scholarships to teachers, and provide ongoing professional development comes from two agencies: Health and Human Services and Department of Education. The money from HHS is sent to Head Start to fund Head Start Agencies, and to States to use to fund child care in the ways that fit the needs of their specific state. In some cases it goes to subsidies to help low income families afford child care, but it is never enough to cover the actual cost the child care programs incur, so the parents co-pay a minimal amount, but that's not even enough. In many cases, those same child care organizations also serve middle income families who pay tuition which is very costly, but even that is not enough to cover the cost of care. Head Start and Child Care make up most of the HHS funding that goes out, and it hardly covers the actual costs for all of the children that need to be served. The Department of Education allocates a smaller share of money to states to allocate to Pre-K, which is also for low income children.

    That's pretty complicated, right?

    My point is that (in most cases) you and your colleagues are not being ripped off by wealthy child care organizations. The Federal government and States do not currently prioritize child care and the child care workforce by providing the incredible amount of funding to ensure teachers are well prepared with degrees, provided worthy wages, and have health care and retirement plans. They are not prioritizing making child care affordable and accessible for families. Most of all, they are not doing enough to support the infrastructure of high quality child care and early learning for young children. We were making great strides with the previous administration, but even then, it was never enough. It takes all of us, including you, to work together to inform policy makers who really don't understand what it takes to operate early care and education organizations.

    I know this doesn't help much, but your story is important. Thanks for lending your voice to the conversation. If you can, join the webinar (or watch the recording after you get off work) Clarity and Accountability as Necessities for ECE Compensation by Marica Cox Mitchell on January 24.

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    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------