Open Discussion Forum

Topic: music in classrooms

  • Age Group
  • All
  • Audience
  • Teacher
  • Curriculum
  • Creative Arts
  • Other Topics
  • Classroom management and organization

1.  music in classrooms

Posted 05-16-2017 02:58 PM
We have loads of cd's that we use in our classrooms. They just don't make quality cd players anymore.
What do you all use to play music? We are thinking about moving to tablets and downloading our cd's and then using a separate  speaker.

------------------------------
Cynthia Hicks
Springfield NJ
------------------------------


2.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 04:21 AM
Cynthia,

There are so many different ways to integrate music into classroom these days, its pretty awesome!! My question to you is how comfortable do you feel about utilizing various forms of technology? Now, you can even listen to music from your own cell phone! It's amazing!!

I have used many different types of technological platforms, which by the way are very easy to use!! For an example, I use my cell phone, laptop (provided by my school district), Ipads, SmartBoards, etc. I should ask..do you have access to these types of equipments, besides your cell phone and Ipads?

------------------------------
Ankit Shah
Educational Academy for Boys and Girls
Columbus OH
------------------------------



3.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 06-10-2017 12:30 PM
In my classroom, we have a CD player that we use to play instrumental music. We also have a tablet but we don't use it for the purpose of music. The music we play cannot have words and must strictly be rhymatic or instrumental so we get creative and find other ways of making music.

We sing a lot of songs and make up songs and dances to the music we play. Another thing we do is give the children instruments so that they can create their own music rather than us play a CD. We even create little microphones and some of the children like to sing while another plays an instrument.

------------------------------
Alicia Oldham
------------------------------



4.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 06-12-2017 04:35 PM
Hi, Cynthia

I have so much cd and getting them to play on the cd player is a bit of a problem, because the player sometime run the cd and no sound come out. Secondly the music start to play and all of a sudden it stop playing the cd. Know I use You Tube to get the music for the children in my Day Care. Cynthia you are right they just dose not make good cd player any more.

------------------------------
Petra Wickham-Charles
Brooklyn NY
------------------------------



5.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 06:53 AM
Hi Cynthia,
We had the same situation in our school a few years ago.  Each of the teachers took the CD collection home over the summer and loaded music on to an iPod.  We use an iHome speaker system which takes up much less space than a CD player, and because we can pre-program the music into playlists, it's much easier than when we used CDs.  It has also been nice to be able to add songs to the collection here and there through iTunes purchases and downloading mp3s from various websites which is much less expensive than buying CDs.

Dianne

------------------------------
Dianne Rose
Reston VA
------------------------------



6.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 08:11 AM
We switched from CDs to ipod about nine years ago. Currently, I use a music service and a blue tooth speaker. The wireless blue tooth speaker allows me to take music with us everywhere. It's great and convenient. Dance parties everywhere!

------------------------------
Phillip Baumgarner
Hull GA
------------------------------



7.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 09:01 AM
I use iTunes. It is free and it allows you to upload all of your CDs to play on your computer, tablet or smart phone. The great thing about iTunes is the search feature. You can search by album, artist, or song. So, for example, if it starts to rain outside and you want to play some songs about rain, you just type "rain" in the search box and click play on the list of songs that comes up. No more rummaging through a box of scratchy CDs! No more putting in one CD at a time! And, once you have iTunes, you can use it to order songs instantly. So - if you didn't happen to have a song for that rainy day, you could find one and play it right away.

------------------------------
Karen Nemeth
Language Castle LLC
Newtown PA
------------------------------



8.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 09:18 AM
Apologies for the possible wet blanket post, but...

As someone who is a music lover (guitar player for over four decades) that has a hard time with noisy environments, I want to share a caveat I was given by a special education colleague many years ago, who asked us to remember that not everyone's needs are supported by music in the room. Our faculty was big on dance parties and often played their (US, English language) favorites in the room. Our colleague reminded us that children with hearing problems (or ear infections), English language learners, children who are sorting out sensory integration issues, and kids who just like quiet can often find such experiences very challenging.

So party on! But do keep an eye out for little folks who might find the party a bit too much.

------------------------------
Chris Amirault
Affiliate Advisory Council
Mérida, Yucatán, México
camirault@naeyc.org
------------------------------








9.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-18-2017 11:02 AM
I have to agree with you, Chris.  My mom was a preschool teacher for about 50 years. She had to show proficiency in playing a musical instrument to get her New Jersey N-8 teaching certificate, so she raised me to love the magic that music brings to early childhood education. But, sometimes music DOES get too overwhelming in early childhood. Good music is great, but using music is not always good!  I've read about research that shows that too much background noise makes it hard for dual language learners to detect the speech sounds they need to learn the new language. We also know that music played during meal times inhibits those critical, language-building conversations. So I AM in favor of music that is chosen intentionally and responsively for a purpose.... and sometimes that purpose can just be silly! But, quiet is also good!

------------------------------
Karen Nemeth
Language Castle LLC
Newtown PA
------------------------------



10.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-22-2017 05:18 PM
Yes, many children are very sensitive to loud sounds, particularly music.  So avoid very loud music.

------------------------------
Joanne Rutkowski
State College PA
------------------------------



11.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 01:10 PM
I use a small ipod and portable speaker because I am a specialty movement teacher and need to bring the music with me.

------------------------------
Mary Lynn Hafner
Sammamish WA
------------------------------



12.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-17-2017 01:16 PM
What's YOUR favorite music??  Please share what you're loving these days. Always looking for new stuff.

My top 3 songs this month:
1. You tube: Just dance the ants go marching (modern twist on old favorite-- brain break song)--follow along video too!
2.  Be Me by Rissi Palmer (light and sweet)
3. Clap Your Hands by They Might be Giants (quick upbeat, bring the energy up movement song)

------------------------------
Mary Lynn Hafner
Sammamish WA
------------------------------



13.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-18-2017 08:51 AM
Lately I have noticed my children making the music with the instruments. One of them asked me to put on some music, and I said they were making their own. It was beautiful, if a little noisy. But they were able to control the intensity to what they were comfortable with.
Some of our recorded favorites are:
1. Polka Dot Pants Dance from the Nut Family
2. Each of Us is a Flower by Charlotte Diamond
3. Sticky Sticky Bubble Gum by Macaroni Soup
4. Seeds by Gemini

Our true favorites are the ones we make up ourselves.

------------------------------
Catherine Roach
Milwaukee WI
------------------------------



14.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-18-2017 10:01 AM
Dance music in my classroom tends to explore pop songs. I will confess that at one point I didn't believe in playing music made for older people in the classroom. Then I started notices that children new many popular songs and some older pop tunes, so I started exploring this avenue.
Current dance favorites:
1. Rock Lobster by the B-52's
2. Don't Bring Me Down by ELO
3. Fox on the run by Sweet

I think it is important to use music intentionally. We use The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds as a conclusion to our rest time. During quiet moments we might listen to Keith Jarrett or Erik Satie.

------------------------------
Phillip Baumgarner
Hull GA
------------------------------



15.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-22-2017 05:23 PM
Oh yes!  Music is music; use as wide a variety as possible.  "Children's" music is OK, but often much of this is all the same.  Use pop, classical, jazz, world music . . .

------------------------------
Joanne Rutkowski
State College PA
------------------------------



16.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-19-2017 11:40 AM
Thanks!

------------------------------
Mary Lynn Hafner
Sammamish WA
------------------------------



17.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 05-22-2017 05:21 PM
I LOVE this - that the children said they were making their own music!  Encourage that as much as you can and interact with children musically (singing, chanting, moving) as much as possible; in informal ways during play.  As with language, children need to have interactions with others, not just hear language in the background.  The same is true for music - it's musical interactions with others that is so important!  Nothing wrong with recorded music - that allows children to be exposed to a wide variety of music - but that alone is not going to nurture children's natural musical development.

------------------------------
Joanne Rutkowski
State College PA
------------------------------



18.  RE: music in classrooms

Posted 06-05-2017 02:10 AM
  |   view attached

 

Karen Nemeth,

Language Castle LLC

Newtown, PA

Karen@languagecastle.com

 

Members of NAEYC

 

Dear Karen and Members of NAEYC interested in Music and the Young Child

 

I am a special education teacher working for the Elizabeth, NJ Board of Education. As such, I consult with the Early Childhood Education teachers about the Pre-K disabled students in their classes. One goal is to monitor the child's progress in every domain so that I may be able to provide a description of his abilities in each domain for the case manager to put into the IEP by the time of the Annual Review.

 

Many of the children are dual language learners, learning in classes where one teacher is Spanish dominant, one is English dominant, and the children are learning in both languages. In some classes there is a third language in use: sign language for the pre-verbal children.

 

I check on the Pre-K disabled students in seven schools every week. In anticipation of Week of the Young Child, which designates Monday as Music Monday, as music facilitates learning, I designed and implemented music presentations for all the Pre-K students in those seven schools, reaching 450 Pre-K students that week.

 

My music program may be of interest to early childhood educators and music educators, and be appropriate in a description of events that took place in Week of the Young Child in 2017. I would be glad to learn who to contact for that.

 

For a description of my music program, here is a link to the write-up and photos that appeared on the Home Page of the Elizabeth NJ public schools. If anyone is interested in more information I will be very glad to pursue it.

 

http://www.epsnj.org/site/default.aspx?PageType=3&DomainID=4&ModuleInstanceID=7312&ViewID=6446EE88-D30C-497E-9316-3F8874B3E108&RenderLoc=0&FlexDataID=32207&PageID=1

 

Sincerely,

 

Donna Messer, M.ED., CALT

Certified Academic Language Therapist         Academic language Therapy Association

Certified Dyslexia Therapist                          International Dyslexia Association

Certified Recorder Teacher                             American Recorder Society

Teacher – Resource Center

Elizabeth Public Schools, NJ



------------------------------
Donna Messer
Highland Park, NJ
------------------------------



'