Open Discussion Forum

Expand all | Collapse all

Technology

  • 1.  Technology

    Posted 03-06-2018 02:48 PM
    Do you think that 3 & 4 years old are to young to start learning about computer technology? And could it be implemented in childcare facilities?
    Thanks


  • 2.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 06:50 AM
    They do have the cognitive capability to learn about this technology, but should it be in the classroom? My thought is no. I have a computer in my classroom for teacher use. The children see my use it to enter the food program, or look up articles to print. There is an iPad in the room, but again it is for teacher use. We use it for music, our communication app with the parents.
          Screen time for this age group is already high enough. I feel we should build their vocabulary around it, model how to use and how often it should be used. I do not think children need to interact with computers and iPads (games, websites, etc.) in the classroom until public school (and even then I think it starts too young.)

    ------------------------------
    Sasha Shunk
    owner/director
    Shunk Child Care
    Portland ME
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 09:43 AM
    I am in agreement with an earlier response of 'no'.   90% of a child's brain develops by the age of 5 and the experiences before then will have a lasting impact on their health, ability to learn and success in school/life.  It is the most important time for the synaptic connection development in the areas of creativity, curiosity, imagination, caring and relationships.  'How' these connections get built set the fundamentals for the rest of their lives.  In an article  titled "Gray Matters; Too Much Screen Time Damages the Brain" by Victoria L. Dunckley M.D in Psychology Today, Ms Dunckley discusses and shows (via actual brain scans) the scientific findings on how computers/electronics are damaging to the brain.  This is only one of many articles becoming available on this topic.  Which in turn leads me to one of the most compelling assertions I can make on how highly STEM/STEAM programs are being sought after....why?  Because they are hands-on, interactive experiences that cause children to think outside-the-box, question, be creative and think.

    Please don't get me wrong, I'm not completely against electronics, but I am in agreement again with a response earlier, they should be introduced 'formally' in or after 1st grade.  I am a firm believer in the theories of Vygotsky, Reggio Emilia and Piaget in that children learn through play, and those concepts were developed well before the technological advances we have today.   Another aspect that is a huge factor in the use of technology at such a young age is how it affects a child's 'sensitivity'.  It could just be me, but does anyone else feel electronics lead to a de-sensitization of the human conditions of caring, emotions and empathy?  Again, I am not against electronics, I am just not really a big proponent of them before the age of at least 6.  In the past few years a term has started circulating about electronics that call them the 'digital heroin' for our children.  I have read numerous viewpoints on this 'term/thought process' and have my own thoughts, but in the grand scheme, the idea that such a term has even been invented is something that should at least make one stop and think about it.

    Under 6, let them 'learn through play'....like hands-on, outdoors, mudpie kind of stuff!  Let life be messy, at least as a kid.  :-)

    ------------------------------
    Shawn Lord
    Educator/Trainer
    Kinsci!
    Ft Walton Bch FL
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 11:13 AM
    I read something recently that simplified the issue for me.  Paraphrased, it said "What WON'T THE CHILD BE DOING while they are using the electronics/technology?"

    That moves the issue away from whether or not the technology is a good idea/beneficial, etc. and puts it back on the things the child could be doing instead that have been proven by research to be beneficial in the connections that need to take place in the brain during those formative years.  That simplified it for me.    ​

    ------------------------------
    Andrea Dekker
    TA Specialist
    United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona
    Tucson AZ
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 01:36 PM
    ​I feel technology has a place in early childhood only when the teacher is sharing it's use such as investigating science questions or referencing something the child may not have seen or heard of before. I taught K4-1st grade for many years and saw technology starting to replace the teacher reading to the child, doing  music/movement with the child and teaching concepts to the child. When a story is read by a computer, the child misses out on explanations of vocabulary, predicting the storyline, talking about the pictures, explanation of a catch phrases and even the  fluctuation of voice and facial expressions used when there is a question mark or explanation mark which are all very important beginning skills to reading. Music through technology often lacks the example of guided movement which should include cross-brain motions. Words in music are often misunderstood and need explained. Again, expression is lost such as a deep voice/high voice/scary voice or big steps/tiny steps/steps walking "down". I have seen children not participating with music on a smart board when as a teacher, I can involve them by moving closer to them, acting silly, singing louder, getting them involved! Interaction with a person is NOT the same as the interaction we get with technology. Technology does not "see" the questioning eyebrows or tilt of the head or the blank stare that tells a teacher  the child needs further explanation or that they don't have the background knowledge to make a connection. With this being said, testing in the schools is being done with computers at the K4 level now and if a child is not familiar with navigating their way on a computer then it does hurt their scores.

    ------------------------------
    Tanya Going
    Owner/Director
    Simply Imagine Learning Center
    Pryor OK
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:11 AM
    Sasha, Yes!
    I totally agree. Our modeling and discussion around it is more important than children having access to it in the classroom.
    Thank you for your words if wisdom.

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-17-2018 09:40 AM
    A mentor once told me people on either side of a debate could find research to prove they were right. I didn't see how that was possible but have since realized this is true. Given that -- and my belief that there are too few people who understand developmentally appropriate practice in general, let alone where technology is concerned -- I have to ask myself two questions: Is there any potential harm that can come to children from too little technology? And: Is there any potential harm to children from too much?

    I've appreciated the thoughtful contributions to this discussion, but I'm compelled to stand by my position that it's better to be safe than sorry.

    ------------------------------
    Rae Pica
    Rae Pica Keynotes & Consulting
    Alexandria VA
    www.raepica.com
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-18-2018 09:17 AM
    Thank you Rea,
    I agree it is better to be safe than sorry.
    Thank you Peggy and Andrea, you had very sound, thoughtful and well presented arguments.  I agree with a lot you are saying.
    Let me be clear, I am not anti-technology. I am "Educator Be Ware."  It has its uses and needs. But in a culture that is so media, technology and me oriented, I feel we need to find a proper balance and exposure.
    As example years ago allowing children to use calculators in school to do math and teaching factor families became all the rage. I have some school students today who can not complete simple math equation in a normal completion time because they don't know how to show or prove their work, others whose parents or teachers who felt strongly about the use of calculators in elementary school classrooms took the time to teach math the "old fashioned way" as well as the "new way" those children handle not having the technology of the calculator handy in a much more confident manner.
    @Faith Rogow, I appreciate your time to answer. I did not present the Blog as clinical research. My words were, "Here is an interesting article that addresses many of the points brought up in this thread." Had it been an article from a clinically published piece of study I would gave cited it as such.
    There is clinical research out their to support points on both sides,​ I do read these, on both sides of the argument,  because I believe in making sound decisions based on researching both sides of an argument and forming conclusions based on theses findings and professionals.
    Often I come to a point of reflection and belief in an argument near middle ground but more or less towards one or the other proposed ideas. Rarely, am I a polar opposite viewpoint person in a discussion.
    Lets face it, technology is new when you think of all the advancements we ha seen in our lifetime and there are advancements to come along we have NOT even dreamed of yet. Therefore, our research on how it affects children, adults, education, our teaching practices and even what Best Practices for children is constantly evolving and changing.
    So, I like Rea Pica will continues to be cautious about how I use it and continue to do research on its harm and benefits for myself. I will read some of the articles and researchers you have presented. I am familiar with Sonia Livingstone and have read some of her research.
    By assuming I had not read articles and research with a different perspective, and because I presented an article by a blog as interesting, not as proof of my opinion; you made assumptions that I as a professional and peer, did not do research in the appropriate manner, nor with regard to two sides of a discussion.
    That is something in Early Childhood Education we need to be careful of, for not everyone in our profession has they same training and exposure and thus we must be respectful to all as we educate and debate together to promote Best Practices for Children.
    Until we have sound research, what is the harm in being cautious for the minds were are helping develop?

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-15-2018 02:39 PM
    Here is an interesting article that address many of the points brought up in this thread of conversation.
    http://deeprootsathome.com/screen-time-childs-brain/
    I would encourage everyone to read it.
    Yes, technology is here to stay and it has its place, but it is also causing lots of mental health issues  and physical development.
    We have children during critical brain development and must be aware of all the possibilities and harm this tool causes, both with proper and improper use. We can control our environments, but we can not control the environments the children encounter when not in our care.

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-16-2018 08:23 AM
    Thank you for sharing this link, Helen! This is why I say it's better to be safe than sorry!

    ------------------------------
    Rae Pica
    Rae Pica Keynotes & Consulting
    Alexandria VA
    www.raepica.com
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-17-2018 03:23 PM
    Here is another interesting article put out by Google on STEM after doing research on their own company.
    http://michiganfuture.org/01/2018/google-finds-stem-skills-arent-the-most-important-skills/

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-19-2018 11:36 AM
    What a great discussion with clear messages and sincere interest in the lives of our children and families now in the 21st century with so many competing activities for young children's time during this sensitive and foundation period of development.
    While I was reading everyone's posts.. another post came up from Child Trends..

    (the following is quoted from) https://us16.campaign-archive.com/?u=2dcd6a778a067d2b0f01fd186&id=f75de85e8b

    5 ways screen time can benefit children and families

    This is from the AAP.. they released new guidelines for children ages zero to five in October 2016 that emphasize the importance of parents' engagement with their children when using digital media.

    Even though I don't think the term "screen time" adequately addresses the discussion of appropriate technologies uses... Just thought I would share...

    The AAP recommends five ways for parents and young children to use media positively...
    1.

    Certain kinds of digital tools can support family interactions. 

    Using video chat (Skype, Facetime, etc.) a

    2.

    It's important to support children's healthy development through co-viewing and co-playing.

    Children as young as 18 months may be able to learn from digital media when co-viewing or co-playing with an engaged adult (although additional research is necessary to support this recommendation). It is important that parents answer and ask questions about the material they are co-viewing, point out important concepts, and blend the content they are viewing together into their daily lives and routines. By performing these actions, parents can create a structure to support children's learning from digital material. Through dialogue and interactions, parents can encourage their child's cognitive, linguistic, and social-emotional development even before their second birthday.

    3.
    Parents can choose high-quality digital content for their child's viewing.

    Promoting active engagement with high-quality material is essential for children from birth to age five, but it is also important to consider the interests and needs of individual children. Websites like Common Sense Media, PBS Kids, and Sesame Workshop can help parents decide which apps and programs are best for their children.

    4.

    Like physical tools, digital tools can promote school readiness.

    Family support for school readiness is found in traditional forms like book reading and newer technologies such as e-books. Whether a story is in print or digital format, parents can help children develop the skills they need for school by engaging in dialogic reading with their child-asking them questions about the stories and relating the content to the child's life. Research suggests that preschoolers can learn best from well-designed e-books with limited distracting features (such as games and sounds), and when parents' questions focus on the stories themselves rather than the features of the electronic medium (such as pushing buttons).

    5.

    Digital tools can support parent and child togetherness.

    Technology can elicit exciting topics for conversation and encourage family members to spend time with one another. Through conversation and family time, parents can engage in critical responsive communications that are essential to their child's healthy development.

    Acknowledgements: Thank you to Kristen Darling, Kaylor Garcia, Gayane Baziyants, Kim Alleyne, and Josh Sparrow for their time and insights shared in the development of this blog.



    ------------------------------
    Lynn Hartle
    Professor of Education
    The Penn State University, Brandywine
    Media PA
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-20-2018 08:42 AM
    Thank you Lynn for bringing parent engagement and technology back into the discussion.  In 2014 our campus preschool began using a blog for parent communication/engagement in which the teachers posted pictures and videos each week. We found in our research that families used the blog to talk to their children about their days at the preschool.  In addition, many of the families viewed the blog with their children as part of the bedtime routine.  One of the most frequent comments parents made was that their knowledge of what went on in the classroom became so much greater when they viewed the blog.

    ------------------------------
    Donna Karno
    University of Maine, Farmington
    Farmington ME
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-16-2018 10:17 AM
    Sorry Helen, I'm all for robust discussion, but we have to demand more of ourselves than basing our conclusions on blog posts that rely on anecdotal evidence, cite selectively from the ever-expanding literature on media effects, and repeat long-debunked assertions (like comparing screens to cocaine). If we're going to accept anecdotal evidence as enough, I can you tell dozens of stories of remarkable ways that screens have enhanced individual family's lives and contributed to children's development. You wouldn't - and shouldn't - accept that as adequate proof from me; you shouldn't be satisfied with it when it comes from those who reinforce your existing beliefs. In media literacy circles we call that succumbing to "confirmation bias" (the tendency to believe the things we agree with no matter the evidence).
         It is revealing that lifelong researchers of the subject, like Sonia Livingstone, express concerns but ultimately come to very different conclusions than the blogger you cite. Those who prefer to read blog-style writing over academic journal articles might look at Livingstone's blog:  http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/parenting4digitalfuture/ . And, of course, there's all the meticulously gathered research supporting NAEYC's Technology Position Statement - research that continues at places like the Erikson Institute and Northwestern University.
          In evidence-based practice, we not only have to say "I looked and this is what I saw." We have to explain why others' evidence that contradicts our findings is wrong. When it comes to screen time, all sides need to do this. Scholars like Livingstone, Jackie Marsh, David Buckingham, Ellen Wartella, and many more do this as a matter of course. Those who prefer to ring the alarmist bell than deal with the nuances of research, even when they have the best of intentions, rarely do it. Why is that?

    ------------------------------
    Faith Rogow
    Media Literacy Education Maven
    Insighters Education
    Ithaca NY
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-16-2018 08:22 PM
    Oh, @Faith Rogow, I think you mean you want us to be more media literate! You are pointing out the importance of being informed and discerning consumers of content. "Consider the source" is an important lesson for children and adults, especially at this point in our history, what with misinformation campaigns all about. I could not agree more. Thanks for your endless desire for our field to rise to the occasion.

    Here's my take on your position: As a profession, we must rely on hard evidence.  I think it's safe to say we can find hard scientific evidence that supports our positions on just about every aspect of early education no matter what our position. The key is for us to consume the research, analyze and synthesize it to support our case, no matter what our case is. Using opinion pieces and content that comes from sources with specific agendas should be sorted out and considered for what they are, not used to support rigorous discussions.

    Aside from your point, as you said earlier in this thread, it's time to put the conjecture, opinion and debate aside. We continue to debate what has been debated for the past 20-25 years. There is plenty of guidance to demonstrate developmentally appropriate, constructive, and balanced use of technology and plenty of science to support the practical guidance.  For me, it's a matter of our profession taking a stand to interrupt this endless debate about technology. My message to my profession is to become informed. Stop resisting because of long-held beliefs and open your mind to the possibilities before you make decisions that simply support the status-quo. Ask yourself if you might just be wrong and go out and seek answers. Aren't you curious about the potential? Maybe you are right. Maybe you are wrong, but you can't know if you don't read or otherwise consume (webinars, presentations, videos, etc.) that challenge your assumptions.

    Do you believe that your passionate colleagues on the other side of the technology debate have nefarious intentions?Are we out to hurt and corrupt children? Come on.

    The pro-tech position is not about moving away from developmentally appropriate practice. It's not about replacing play. It's not about ruining children's eyesight, or corrupting their brains, or making them addicts. It's all about finding new ways to incorporate all that surrounds you and the children for whom you care into your developmentally appropriate framework. Yes, it can be done. Yes, it is being done. Just open your eyes to the resources that have repeatedly been linked to from this thread and others. It's all right there for you to read, view, and consider.  ​

    ------------------------------
    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Author of Digital Decisions, Choosing the Right Technology Tools for Early Childhood Education
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-17-2018 07:52 AM

    I agree with Andrea that we should think about "What WON'T THE CHILD BE DOING while they are using the electronics/technology?" And with Tanya that not all music heard by children in early childhood settings should be from electronic recording (because first-hand human-guided music experiences include that important relationship piece). I agree with Rae that children need lots of movement to develop fully. And I agree with Faith that as we develop ways to research to understand the development of young children, we owe it to them, to their health and future, to make sure we ask good questions and report on the evidence-based research. We owe it to children to keep our wonderings and concerns as questions until our "personal knowledge-of-a-child type research," or a scientific study research provides guidance. 

    For example:

    I am so grateful that my parents chose to have me immunized against the polio virus-a decision based on research. Scientific research continues to support immunizing as a best health practice for most.

    In the past, autism was attributed to the mother-child relationship and we know now, through research and personal experience, not to attribute it to the mother's emotional connection with her child.

    And we all have "personal research" stories where we figured out what a child needed, based on our close observations and personal relationship with the child. 

    Screentime? I agree with Fran: "It's all about finding new ways to incorporate all that surrounds you and the children for whom you care into your developmentally appropriate framework." I like to be in the play yard or out in the woods…taking photos with a digital camera to discuss with children later as we continue to explore those spaces. 



    ------------------------------
    Peggy Ashbrook
    Early childhood science teacher
    Alexandria, VA
    NSTA The Early Years columnist, Science and Children
    Early Years blogger, www.nsta.org/earlyyears
    Author: Science Learning in the Early Years, and
    Science Is Simple
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-17-2018 11:02 AM
    Oh, @Peggy Ashbrook, I so agree with all you, say, too! I agree with those you cited, as well. I'm one of the most conservative early childhood technology advocates I know. I agree with most of the science-based and pragmatic concerns that have been voiced in this debate. I just urge our field to use common sense whether they use technology or not.

    Just to clarify, even though I am a proponent of using technology in early education, I urge caution! Technology tools are likely to be misused and even abused in the absence of careful understanding, training, practice, and intention. In fact, in Digital Decisions: Choosing the Right Technology Tools for Early Childhood Education, Karen Nemeth and I carefully outline concerns and how to use technology with intention. We worked hard to ensure the readers align their practices with DAP and with research-based best practice, as well as plain old common sense.

    I strongly believe that if program administrators and teachers who do not embrace learning more about technology, they should just listen to their hearts, and just don't use it! It's OK. Young children will survive if they don't have technology in their classrooms. However, those who choose to cover their ears and eyes will miss significant opportunities to teach children to use media with intention and purpose to create and (not passively) consume content. The sad fact is, the media influences they will have for sure, are parents, siblings, and other unhealthy influences who do not understand developmentally appropriate practice or DAP tech use. Thus, those influences will go unchecked, and children will not only miss important opportunities, but they will also be set upon a path of misusing media unchecked.

    ------------------------------
    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Co-Author of Digital Decisions, Choosing the Right Technology Tools for Early Childhood Education
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------



  • 18.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-17-2018 11:30 AM
    I've been following this discussion since the beginning and everyone has made good points. Since I enjoy watching TED talks for kicks, I thought I would challenge everyone to visit Sir Ken Robinson's very famous talk, "Do schools kill creativity?", as I feel that this particular talk touches on many of the points made on this discussion. STEM education is now being mainlined into preschool curriculum. There is plenty of 'professional research and journal evidence' showing brain development during the first three years of life, and I tend to agree with Sir Robinson on how the early years are especially relevant, because kids have not been "taught" yet the fear of failure, or as he puts it, "having a go at it". The result is creativity is lost and our society suffers from the loss of it. He also makes a joke of intellectuals, himself included. I changed careers in 2014 (at age 46) from corporate business management and returned to community college to earn associate degree(s) in Early Childhood Education and School-Age Education, countless certifications, work as a Student Intern in Childcare and am now completing my Bachelor's in Birth-Kindergarten/Early Childhood Education. I'll be 50 when I graduate next May. What tickles me is, I raised three children who are now 25-29. Some of my professors are in their 30's and have tiny children, which tells me, they have very little (actual) child-rearing experience or teaching experience, as I personally know what it takes to get your doctorate degree. I mainly say that in response to remarks that were made suggesting that perhaps intellectual research deserves more 'credit' than others who are 'in the trenches', so to speak. Well, we are all in it for the children, are we not?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iG9CE55wbtY&t=3s


    ------------------------------
    Meg Marchese
    Preschool Teacher
    Belmont, NC
    ------------------------------



  • 19.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 07:29 AM
    So young children are already exposed to a LOT of technology.  I've seen babies in grocery stores with their faces in a phone/device.  This is also why many children are showing up to programs with a language deficit.  Instead of interacting with the grocery store (pictures/print/people/interactions) they are missing all of the opportunities to hear language, use language, process language.  So if they're already using technology, and you want to use it in your program, you could find ways to make them "producers" with the technology, and not simply consumers (just following what the device is telling them).  Children can take pictures - so if they go on a "letter hunt" they can take pictures of all of the T's in the classroom.  Or pictures of objects that begin with "S."  Then they can share their findings with a friend or group - giving them practice with communication skills.  I have three year olds that are proficient with these skills.  There are free apps (Show Me) that will allow them to draw pictures and save - like a white board but the work is kept on the device.  So they can draw in response to a story, or tell something that they saw at the zoo.  Again, this is a form of communication and I would encourage them to share their story.  I hesitate to simply find good apps to put kids on - the intention behind that is usually to keep them quiet for a while - they are getting plenty of that outside your doors.  Young kids have a wealth of knowledge about devices already - make them the stewards of technology by encouraging them to tell stores, draw pictures, and communicate with the device as a tool!

    ------------------------------
    Leslie Frei
    Teacher Specialist for Early Childhood Education
    Frederick County Public Schools
    Frederick MD
    ------------------------------



  • 20.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 11:04 AM
    "you could find ways to make them "producers" with the technology, and not simply consumers (just following what the device is telling them). " YES! wonderful example.

    ------------------------------
    Kathleen Paciga
    Villa Park IL
    ------------------------------



  • 21.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:14 AM
    Leslie,
    Thank you! I really appreciate your well stated points and solutions.

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 08:33 AM
    So, let's be clear. 3 & 4 year olds are already learning about technology. It surrounds them in their daily lives. They watch what we do (and don't do) with the computers in our pockets, our home media systems, at the grocery store, in our transportation systems and workplaces, our security protocols, etc. And they're already developing habits about how to integrate tech into their lives. So the question for early childhood educators has to be more precise than do we or don't we teach with tech. The question is, what's our stake in shaping or contributing to what children are learning about tech? In practical terms, it's all about what we hope to accomplish and how we use the tech effectively to accomplish those goals. So my question would be, what outcomes are you working towards, why do you think those outcomes are important, and how could/would computers contribute to 3 & 4 year olds achieving those results?

    ------------------------------
    Faith Rogow
    Media Literacy Education Maven
    Insighters Education
    Ithaca NY
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 11:06 AM
    Faith, I was glad to see your post here. Thanks for weighing in. I want there to be a "like" button here for some reason.

    ------------------------------
    Kathleen Paciga
    Villa Park IL
    ------------------------------



  • 24.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 03:58 PM
    Hi Kathleen,

    The blue "recommend" button functions exactly as a "like" on other platforms. I hope this helps. This is a fascinating discussion!

    Sincerely,

    ------------------------------
    Gilmar Rosas
    Community Manager
    NAEYC
    hello@naeyc.org
    ------------------------------



  • 25.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:15 AM
    Thank you. Very good points.

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 26.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 08:39 AM
    It doesn't make me very popular with my tech-loving colleagues, but I agree with Sasha. Children will have plenty of time to interact with technology (too much if we look at what the studies are telling us). Early childhood is a special and unique period in a person's life, and given what we know about how young children learn, the classroom should be a place that offers maximum opportunity for active, experiential learning involving all the senses.

    Because technology use is fairly new we don't yet have a lot of research on its long-term impact. But what we do have is frightening. Vision problems, depression, and aggression are among the effects of too much screen time. At the very least, educators all across the country are telling me that today's children have extremely poor fine motor control. Much of this is due to the fact that they spend more time swiping than gripping a crayon or pair of scissors.

    I would love to see early childhood settings be a place where kids get a break from technology!

    ------------------------------
    Rae Pica
    Rae Pica Keynotes & Consulting
    Alexandria VA
    www.raepica.com
    ------------------------------



  • 27.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:26 AM
    Rea,
    Thank you so much for your comments!
    There is a time and place for technology and my preschool room is not that place. Yes, I use it to communicate with parents, take photos, do adminstrative paper work. I also use it to help with !y music, movement and researching ways to answer questions kids have, but they do not need to be handling it themselves while under my care and instruction.
    I model and explain why I am using it and why they don't need access to it.
    The only time I use it with them is to capture a photo or video, or to do our movement and music time and there it s even limited because I want them to understand you can sing with out music playing in the background. Books are beautiful things and should be handled and cared for and help you find answers to your questions.
    All teacher things are done at nap, prep or break times.
    I think technology is so new we really have no idea the possibility it has for our future NOR the problems and health issues it is yet to create.

    ------------------------------
    Helen Meissner
    Lead Teacher
    Love To Grow On
    Saint Paul MN
    ------------------------------



  • 28.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 09:36 AM
    Hi June,
    Great question, and one that has been up for debate for many years.  NAEYC has a position statement surrounding computer use and children. The American Academy of Pediatrics has their position and many NAEYC members and ECE practitioners argue the matter both for and against.  Check out this insightful link to the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/american-academy-of-pediatrics-announces-new-recommendations-for-childrens-media-use.aspx

    Bottom-line - in today's tech driven and dependent society technology integration is starting to become a differentiator in early learning for administration, academics and data collection..

    Let me share my perspectives. I'll start by saying, We're currently planning four separate pilots on the subject matter in August for the next school year in Georgia. Our areas of focus; academics, behavior, ergonomics and mental health.

    From a realistic perspective many children have access to technology prior to the age of two in the home. Most of it is non structured and foundational.  Technology is a game changer in many aspects of our life's work, entertainment and progress. So much so , that parents are requesting some form of tech integration in their children's academic development.
    That said, is technology right for young children when you look at it from a holistic approach.  Many studies are dated and the most recent ones that I have found come from the medical communities.

    Offering tech as a learning tool to augment your current academic objectives is a novel idea and forward thinking. One caveat,  instituting any new program needs to be thought through thoroughly and strategically aligned with current academic and developmental goals of your constituency, the children and families that you serve.  Talk to the parents, have some discussions and reach out to those who have instituted some form of tech integration in their classrooms.

    Within the past decade ECE and tech has been heating up, the dial has advanced lately with the political posturing of  21st century education and high quality learning directives.   In addition, as states reach further into the centers for curriculum standardization and data collection through PreK programs, it's not likely to get less intrusive but more inclusive.
    Good luck and have a fantastic day.
    Best regards,
    Gary




    ------------------------------
    Gary Beulah
    CEO
    SoftBlue
    Riverdale GA
    ------------------------------



  • 29.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 11:02 AM
    No, I do not think 3-4 year olds are too young to start to learn about computer technology. Technology is a cultural tool and one that can be used with young people, so long as we are intentional and carefully plan for the child, the context, and the content. While there are instances of warranted caution, there is also research (that gets far less press) suggesting that some uses of technology may add value to early childhood investigations, and that high-quality content can lead to additional educational outcomes--especially when utilized in supportive ways that encourage human interaction.

    In addition, many states and programs include technology as a part of the science standards. I have a forthcoming article to feature in HighScope which points, actually, to the inclusion of such standards in the COR Advantage (HighScope) and in Teaching Strategies Gold. In Illinois, where I teach and work, the following standards are applicable:
    For standard 11A, above, I would argue that there are myriad technology tools that can be utilized in place of, or as an enhancement to pencil/paper/printed resources. Part of how we research answers to questions involves internet sources and oftentimes, Youtube videos to help simulate science, engineering, and mathematics conce. Mister Rogers Neighborhood took us to the Crayola factory. The Magic School Bus took us inside the earth. Peg+Cat and Odd Squad are impacting mathematical thinking. Animation and video offer powerful ways to help children make meaning.

    I absolutely do worry when I see children sitting isolated and alone simply consuming video after video, game after game, digital worksheet after digital worksheet. That said, though, I often think that the notion of "screen time" is offered up as proof of lack of worth. And the ECERS-R positions screen time in such a way. If this is the evaluation tool utilized in your childcare facility, then your use of technology becomes more of a challenge. The ECERS-R utilizes minutes as the principle metric, when there are other important factors worth considering: what children DO with the technology, the PEOPLE with whom those experiences are shared, and the CONTENT that is learned?

    ------------------------------
    Kathleen Paciga
    Villa Park IL
    ------------------------------



  • 30.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-07-2018 01:43 PM
    Having technology in a preschool classroom sits on a fine line-Since it is everywhere you go and usually included in your daily life, how do you make the decision to expose them to it in the classroom? In my professional opinion, as long as it is not taking the place of developmentally appropriate play and you are not using it to "teach" your children, some exposure is okay. Some teachers use it in addition to their lesson plans. For example, if you are learning about the farm and you want to show them pictures of real cows and the sounds they make, you can play a short video of real farm life.

    ------------------------------
    Delicia Parker
    Houston TX
    ------------------------------



  • 31.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 10:26 AM
    From a slightly different perspective in my science museum, we are in the process of intentionally taking much of the technology out of our early learning exhibit. Kids have a lot of screen time already, and we'd rather encourage them to interact with the people and objects in our exhibit.

    However, I just developed a workshop for local preschool teachers that is all about how to use apps to teach science in the classroom. When children want to know about the bird at the bird feeder or plant on the playground, teachers can model how to find answers to their questions. "I don't know, let's look it up on the bird/plant app."  Or we can use a magnifier app to look closely at different fabrics during our clothing unit.  Or we can take pictures of our growing seedlings every day and use a video app to turn them into a stop motion video so we can talk about their growth over time. Or we can use a sound app to help us decide which musical instrument in the basket is the loudest (or softest). It's not about handing the kid the device necessarily, and it's not about kids doing electronic worksheets. Rather it's about using technology to foster kids observation skills, communication skills, and to help them answer their questions or solve problems.

    Best,
    Miriam

    ------------------------------
    Miriam Krause
    Maryland Science Center
    Baltimore MD
    ------------------------------



  • 32.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 11:01 AM
    Interactive technology that is thoughtfully integrated into curriculum becomes part of learning through play.  The decision to bring technology into a preschool classroom is one of philosophy and beliefs, but I firmly believe that technology is not "just" screen time that takes away from play.  I think a critical issue is the lack of training early childhood professional receive on appropriate integration of interactive technology into curriculum.  There are lots of examples of bad practice with technology.

    ------------------------------
    Donna Karno
    University of Maine, Farmington
    Farmington ME
    ------------------------------



  • 33.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 11:20 AM
    Using technology in the pre-K classroom is one of the topics I offer for professional development workshops. Some of the points I offer participants for discussion:

    ~ This doesn't have to be an "either-or" proposition: no tech or all tech. There is a negotiable middle ground.
    ~ Not all tech is created equal: there are some excellent apps for tablets and software for computers that are imaginatively engaging, cognitively challenging, and physically interactive--"lean forward" instead of "lean back" experiences.
    ~ Regulating tech time is the same as regulating overindulgence in any other activity or material: if we have a child who only ever plays with one toy (especially if he/she is then monopolizing that toy so that others can't play with it), we encourage that child to make another choice (once we understand why the child is making that choice in the first place), or introduce other toys into the environment, or limit the time that one child can monopolize that one toy.
    ~ Well designed apps and software can absolutely encourage social engagement and group problem solving: the image of a single child staring blankly at a tablet or smart phone, disconnected from the outside world, is a trope that has become the sole representation of how children interact with technology. It's a convenient over-generalization that does not necessarily represent how children actually use technology in quality pre-K environments.
    ~ Yes, children are over-exposed to digital technology outside the classroom, in often detrimental ways: this is all the more reason that, as early childhood professionals, we have a responsibility to model and provide opportunities for learning how to use those technologies in positive ways and with appropriate restraint and critical evaluation.
    ~ All technology has a learning curve, and is often met with misinterpretation and overreaction: when I first started teaching in 1978, some parents were concerned that early versions of audiobooks (i.e., cassette tapes with "turn the page" prompts) were too passive, even though children loved having the option of listening to a story at different points of the day. As with digital technology, we limited the amount of time each child could engage with them, and still managed to turn out a high percentage of children entering kindergarten with strong literacy skills.
    ~ My grandparents' generation thought my parents' generation would be ruined by radio; my parents' generation thought my generation would be ruined by television; and now my generation is sounding the alarm about digital technologies.

    Diligence, innovation, and creativity in our teaching and classroom practices is an important aspect of our interactions with children. This applies to our approach to technology. Early education and care must remain cognizant of the ways in which children's experiences of the world continually evolve, and we have to evolve with them. Sometimes that means taking a step back and simplifying those experiences, but it also means taking steps forward with the children in our care.

    ------------------------------
    Dr. Rebecca Howard
    Oxford OH
    ------------------------------



  • 34.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-08-2018 08:03 PM
    I believe that having technology in the preschool classroom is beneficial to the program. I do not think children should have very much screen time, but we should introduce them to things of the world. Computer technology is NOW. It plays a role in everything we do. Getting children familiar with using a mouse and keyboard and completing simple tasks on the computer will help prepare for future use. We offer computers during center time and children get about 10 minutes of screen time. This is not taking any significant time away from other activities. Additionally, some children might learn best this way. It is important for us, as educators, to prepare children for the world, how can computers not be part of this education?

    ------------------------------
    Leslie Oliveira
    Director
    Hilmar Cristian Childen's Center
    Hilmar CA
    ------------------------------



  • 35.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-10-2018 02:29 PM
    I understand the impulse to offer the children computer time because technology is part of their world now. But there are two points I always make in regard to this argument:

    1. People like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and my nephew Michael (who can take apart a computer and put it back together!) had no access to computers when they were young...because the technology didn't exist. Despite this, they've more than managed to learn it; they've mastered it! I believe that's because they had strong STEM and problem-solving skills and, clearly, powerful imaginations. If we give children the opportunity to build those skills, they'll be able to tackle whatever is thrown at them in the future.

    2. Where the future is concerned, we have no idea what it's going to look like when today's 4-year-olds are 24-year-olds. The world -- and technology! -- is changing so fast that it's likely any preparation in handling a mouse, etc., will be moot before long.

    ------------------------------
    Rae Pica
    Rae Pica Keynotes & Consulting
    Alexandria VA
    www.raepica.com
    ------------------------------



  • 36.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-11-2018 08:46 AM
    It might surprise some folks to hear me say that I agree with Rae on her 2nd point. If you're using computer time to teach kids things like how to use a mouse, especially as the world moves towards touchscreens and voice commands, you might want to re-think. If it's needed, children will quickly master a mouse (or any other interface) when they are motivated by what they can do with the tool and developmentally capable of doing it. And I'm not all that fond of skill and drill apps either. They leave children stuck in the most basic level of cognitive skill development while making it (falsely) seem like kids are somehow progressing academically. These aren't only a waste of time and money - they can be harmful.

    That said, it always strikes me as odd that those who seem most concerned about the potential ill-effects of screen time are those who are quickest to keep tech out of young hands. How does using a pedagogical framework that amounts to playing "keep away" help children build healthy tech habits and skills? Because that's the ultimate goal, right? Why is it that we seem to intuitively understand that children are more likely to develop print literacy skills if we immerse them in print-rich environments but we think that we can keep children away from tech and they'll somehow magically develop digital and media literacy skills? Imagine what would happen if we said "Wait until kids are in middle school before handing them a book" because we feared that they may come into contact with trashy print materials or that they'd spend too much time indoors and sedentary if they discovered the joys of books at too early an age!

    I imagine that if computers existed when Steve Jobs and Bill Gates were kids, they would have reveled in them, creating their own games, posting videos to YouTube, creating art and stories, and using them to engage with friends. The fact that they didn't have them isn't what enabled them to accomplish what they did. If we followed that logic, then we'd be seeing significant declines in the arts and civic engagement. We're not. Think Hamilton or the students from Parkland.

    Seems to me that the loudest voices decrying screen use for young children are those who see screens as burdensome in their own lives. It's hard to imagine screens promoting creativity or social interaction if you don't use them that way or if you always feel guilty about your own screen time, or if you're uncomfortable trying to master a new phone every couple of years. But our job isn't to prepare children for our past. It's to get them ready for their future. And there are plenty of developmentally appropriate ways, including things that can't be done without computers/cameras/connectivity, that will lay a strong foundation for our children's quite unpredictable future. (e.g., see the ideas posted with NAEYC's tech position statement or my chapter in Chip Donohue's anthology, Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years for starters) So, once again, I'll urge people to stop wasting time debating whether or not screens have a place in young children's lives, including when they are in our care.  Tech is already in their lives. It's time to turn our attention to how we use it to our - and their - best advantage.

    ------------------------------
    Faith Rogow
    Media Literacy Education Maven
    Insighters Education
    Ithaca NY
    ------------------------------



  • 37.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-12-2018 09:26 AM
    Faith, I appreciate your thoughtful response. And I certainly see your point about teaching children healthy tech habits and skills. Sadly, after 38 years in the field and many more years on this planet, I've heard and witnessed enough stories to render me cynical about the possibility of that happening often enough.

    My worry is that had tech been available when Steve Jobs and Bill Gates were young, their likely addition to it would have caused the aggression, depression, vision problems, etc., being witnessed in so many of today's young people. So my "loud voice" comes not from the "burden" of screens in my life (I am, after all, a podcast host and a YouTube creator --self-taught-- and I self-published my most recent book, both digitally and in print, using Amazon's CreateSpace), but from the belief that it's better to be safe than sorry.

    I do hope that wherever there is technology in early childhood programs, it's being used in developmentally appropriate, creative, and minimal ways, and that the children are learning healthy habits and skills. But, given our penchant in this country for extremes and our love of the "new and shiny" stuff, I'm afraid that's likely to be the exception rather than the rule.

    ------------------------------
    Rae Pica
    Rae Pica Keynotes & Consulting
    Alexandria VA
    www.raepica.com
    ------------------------------



  • 38.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-12-2018 04:59 PM
    I agree that technology is always evolving and that perhaps eventually there will be no need to know how to control a mouse, but it is what we use today. Yes, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs did not have the technology that we have today and look what they have created. What will our future hold if the starting point now is computers? How much farther advanced will our young masterminds go? I struggle too with the way that technology has taken away social interaction and have become modern day "babysitter's'. I do not think schools should spend lots of money on so-called academic skills software. I am saying that children should be given the opportunity to use them in a productive, healthy way.

    ------------------------------
    Leslie Oliveira
    Director
    Hilmar Cristian Childen's Center
    Hilmar CA
    ------------------------------



  • 39.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-13-2018 08:54 AM
    Rae (and others in the group..) I sincerely share your concern about the misuse of technology/what you may have observed with young children's use of technology.

    That is why some of the points made in this thread seem essential to me- that if we don't have conversations about media use and diet/balance, instead of using tech tools in beneficial and creative ways we will have missed an incredibly important opportunity to have conversations that could significantly impact children's development. Such as, how to use tech tools to support building relationships, nature appreciation, creative expression, opportunities to use affordances (multi-media) provided by tech to increase access to learning (for example, the shy child who won't share story ideas out loud but wants to record/hear her/his own voice...).

    The final section of an article co-authored by Chip Donohue and Roberta Schomburg, published by NAEYC last fall https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/yc/sep2017/technology-and-interactive-media
    shares foundational elements to consider when using tech with young children based on "a synthesis of position statements, reports, research reviews, guidelines, and recommendations released between 2012 and 2017" . The consensus points start with/include the importance of relationships, co-viewing/active parent engagement, social-emotional learning and that it is important tech not replace imaginative play and other valuable early learning activities.

    I am interested in learning more about ways early educators are becoming "media mentors" (some additional info here: teccenter.erikson.edu/publications/medialitecreport/ ) and having conversations using research-informed guidance like the points mentioned in the article above, or other resources to spark conversations in their programs/with families and in their communities about appropriate technology use.

    ------------------------------
    Bonnie Blagojevic
    Morningtown Consulting
    Orono ME
    ------------------------------



  • 40.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-14-2018 08:57 AM

    From the perspective of a parent educator and early childhood advocate, I stand with those voices unafraid to point to screen time impact on child development. Certainly no one is talking about a scree-free childhood. As mentioned, screens are everywhere in a child's life, at home, in the grocery store, at the doctor's office, in the mall. But, where is there a space for their development to be uninterrupted by them? Early educators have an opportunity to focus on building trusted relationships, providing opportunities for the hands-on messy experiences that foster creative problem-solving, cooperation, and 3-dimensional learning essential to brain development. Our children will be required to have screens soon enough and will not have any trouble learning how to use them because they were without them for several hours in their very young life-taking advantage of brain-boosting activities that build a foundation for future learning.

    The Children's Screen Time Action Network Resource Library provides perspectives, just like this discussion, along with tools and best practices that may help educators craft the right solutions for their classrooms.



    ------------------------------
    [Jean] [Rogers]
    [Screen Time Program Manager]
    [Campaign for Commercial-Free Childhood]
    [Boston]
    ------------------------------



  • 41.  RE: Technology

    Posted 04-12-2018 06:47 AM
    Related to this discussion, recently read the blog post "Media Mentors, not Media Police" https://kerileebeasley.com/2018/02/14/media-mentors-not-media-police/ and found it thought provoking. Research about parents approach to technology with children, as "deniers" "enablers" or "mentors" suggested that children not given support/guidance around technology use were more likely to misuse technology, which all children tended to eventually use. And really emphasized the importance of relationship, considering not just media use by children, but with children.

    For those sharing concerns about the misuse of technology/negatively impacting children's growth and development, and interested in considering what we can/should do as educators to help children learn to navigate this digital world and use technology in positive ways/to increase access to learning, there is a new thread/conversation that has started about media literacy . You are invited to join in that discussion and the NAEYC Tech & Young Children virtual meet-up with Faith Rogow in May. (details will be shared there...)

    ------------------------------
    Bonnie Blagojevic
    Morningtown Consulting
    Orono ME
    ------------------------------



  • 42.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-14-2018 09:02 AM
    The use of technology in early learning environments is an area where teacher preparation programs have an important role.  Thinking about the idea of media mentoring can include teacher to teacher media mentoring.  Students (including practicing teachers) should learn appropriate practice with technology (which in my view cannot be separated from the word interactive) and can then bring good practice into existing classrooms.  I find that students are searching for guidance on using technology in their classrooms.

    I agree no mindless, inactive screen time - in fact at any age.

    ------------------------------
    Donna Karno
    University of Maine, Farmington
    Farmington ME
    ------------------------------



  • 43.  RE: Technology

    Posted 03-14-2018 11:06 AM
    @Donna E Karno, you are exactly right. There is a huge gap in teacher preparation programs when it comes to technology. Higher education faculty and paraprofessional training programs have traditionally been slow to respond to this important area of teacher preparation. I think it's a common myth that the current generation of teachers who are digital natives will know how to use technology in the classroom (or for business). Generally speaking, most do know how to use technology for communication and social organization but have little understanding of how to apply their skills to intentionally use technology in developmentally appropriate practice. I hope to see a paradigm shift in higher education and other teacher preparation programs.​

    ------------------------------
    Fran Simon, M.Ed.
    Engagement Strategies, LLC
    Early Childhood Investigations Webinars
    Early Childhood Investigations Consultants Directory
    Washington, DC Metro
    ------------------------------



  • 44.  RE: Technology

    Posted 04-15-2018 10:18 AM
    I agree that children do not need anymore screen time, but I am wondering about using technology for information. For instance, what about researching questions children have, such as what sound does a cardinal make, or how does an ostrich move, or what does ballet look like. These are things that go beyond our classroom, and are some things the children will not have access to without a screen. Also, what about using it for taking photos and having the children look at the photos for discussion purposes or to evaluate them? I am not a fan of the many cartoon apps or watching book videos (instead of tape stories), but I do use it for music and photos. Is it wrong to let 2 1/2-year olds watch a short ballet or look up pictures of trees or how wheels work? In the 'olden days' we would use encyclopedias for stuff like that, but nowadays there are not any available. I could print pictures for them to look at, but I also would like to save as many trees as possible. What are your thoughts? Thank you.

    ------------------------------
    Catherine Roach
    Milwaukee WI
    ------------------------------



  • 45.  RE: Technology